Muslim Family Perplexed at Trump's Portrayals

By Adely, Hannan | The Record (Bergen County, NJ), June 20, 2016 | Go to article overview

Muslim Family Perplexed at Trump's Portrayals


Adely, Hannan, The Record (Bergen County, NJ)


Neighbors know Salaheddin Mustafa of Clifton as a die-hard Giants fan, a Springsteen devotee, a baseball and soccer dad and a man of faith who relishes talking about his children's successes at school and about his siblings -- a crew that includes a lawyer, two teachers and a school administrator.

But after the mass killing in Orlando, Fla., one week ago, Mustafa worries that those who do not know him or his family will judge them based on reports that the shooter was Muslim and on Donald Trump's comments that Muslims don't assimilate to life in the United States and refuse to turn in suspicious people to authorities.

On Sunday, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee doubled down on this approach when he suggested that the United States should "seriously" consider profiling Muslims inside the country as a terrorism-fighting tool.

"We really have to look at profiling," Trump said on CBS's "Face the Nation." ''It's not the worst thing to do."

He added that he "hate[s] the concept of profiling, but we have to use common sense."

For Mustafa, Trump's approach is unsettling and dangerous.

"We are American. All that is in our blood now and can't be taken away," said Mustafa, 47, a financial planner and a member of the state and Passaic County Democratic committees. It's "unfathomable," Mustafa said last week, that anyone would say he and his family -- or any Muslim -- would refuse to join American society, to assimilate.

"It's unfathomable if you were even just to touch the surface of how fully integrated we are," he said. "The bottom line is he is putting us at risk. There is no doubt about it."

That sentiment is shared by many North Jersey Muslim families, some of whom have lived in the area for generations; work and volunteer in schools, city halls and community groups; cheer at parades and football games, and feel the sorrow of national atrocities like anyone else.

In the wake of violence, Trump has painted Muslims as a suspicious group, fueling fears some Americans may already have about a religion many do not understand. Muslims say the businessman and reality television personality, who has also called for a ban on Muslim immigrants and for mass surveillance at mosques, is creating a narrative that they don't see in themselves or their communities.

In a Fox News interview last week, Trump said of Muslims: "Assimilation has been very hard. It's almost, I won't say non- existent, but it gets to be pretty close. And I'm talking about second and third generation. They come, they don't -- for some reason there's no real assimilation and you see it all over the place."

One political scientist said Muslims were integrating at an even faster pace than other groups because of the scrutiny on them.

"The terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, put the whole searchlight on Muslims and they have to prove themselves and continuously have to prove they are here," said Zahid Bukhari, executive director of the Center for Islam and Public Policy, a research center in Washington, D.C.

Muslim Americans have taken on roles in their communities and in government that usually occur much later in the immigrant experience, he said. Muslims hold interfaith events, run for office, and join charity and relief organizations to respond to atrocities and help their communities in the U.S., for instance.

Uttering 'peace'

Practicing Muslims keep their religious traditions -- praying five times a day, fasting during the Ramadan holy month and, for some women, wearing a hijab that covers the head and neck, or for men sporting a beard and cap. They say their faith and patriotism are not at odds, and that extremist beliefs espoused by such groups as ISIS don't represent the religion they know.

"I'm trying to think how many times you say the word 'peace' while praying," Mustafa said. "It is probably 100 times a day that the word 'peace' comes out of your mouth."

Mustafa said he didn't worry about the notion that the ISIS terror group might be trying lure his children online, only because the concept just seems so unrelatable and crazy to their own lives and faith. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Muslim Family Perplexed at Trump's Portrayals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.