A Populist Rebellion; "Around the World, Voices Cry Out: Power to the People" Blared a Recent Cover of the New York Post, Spotlighting Britain's Historic Vote to Split from the European Union -- a Precisely Targeted Strike against Europe's Political and Economic Elite. [Derived Headline]

By Reiland, Ralph R | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 4, 2016 | Go to article overview

A Populist Rebellion; "Around the World, Voices Cry Out: Power to the People" Blared a Recent Cover of the New York Post, Spotlighting Britain's Historic Vote to Split from the European Union -- a Precisely Targeted Strike against Europe's Political and Economic Elite. [Derived Headline]


Reiland, Ralph R, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


"Around the world, voices cry out: Power To The People" blared a recent cover of the New York Post, spotlighting Britain's historic vote to split from the European Union -- a precisely targeted strike against Europe's political and economic elite.

"Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, politics and economics have mostly moved in one direction, with the elites on both sides on the Atlantic favoring policies like the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico, the introduction of European currency and the entry of China into the World Trade Organization," write Nelson Schwartz and Patricia Cohen, economics reporters for The New York Times.

On the issue of Britain's "subservience to the EU," George Will highlighted the level of diminished British sovereignty by pointing out that "privileged bureaucrats" in Brussels had control of "60 to 70 percent of the British government's actions."

Not unlike Hillary Clinton's idea that it takes a village to raise a child, the globalist paradigm maintains that it takes international planning councils to raise the world's behavior by way of restrictions on individual freedom and national sovereignty and the establishment of ever-expanding global rules and commands on state budgets, national debt, income equity, energy, climate, borders and the customs and values of previously self-governing nations.

"The world is coming full circle because now it's the Brits who are free," writes New York Post columnist Michael Goodwin. "It took them a while, but they finally had their own Tea Party and their own revolution."

Donald Trump celebrated the British vote, saying voters "took their country back."

There was less celebrating about the Brexit vote among America's top Democrats. …

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A Populist Rebellion; "Around the World, Voices Cry Out: Power to the People" Blared a Recent Cover of the New York Post, Spotlighting Britain's Historic Vote to Split from the European Union -- a Precisely Targeted Strike against Europe's Political and Economic Elite. [Derived Headline]
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