History Teacher 'Fired Up' His Students; Charles Manoli Was a Teacher with the Ability to Inspire His Students to Think about History beyond the Books He Brought to the Classroom. [Derived Headline]

By Varine, Patrick | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 16, 2016 | Go to article overview

History Teacher 'Fired Up' His Students; Charles Manoli Was a Teacher with the Ability to Inspire His Students to Think about History beyond the Books He Brought to the Classroom. [Derived Headline]


Varine, Patrick, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Charles Manoli was a teacher with the ability to inspire his students to think about history beyond the books he brought to the classroom.

"He was the most important inspiration in my life," said Donald Miller, one of Manoli's students during the 1960s at St. Vincent College. "I was not a good student at the time, and he had a transformative effect on me."

Charles G. Manoli Sr. of Latrobe died of complications following hip surgery on Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016. He was 89.

Mr. Manoli was born June 17, 1927, in Morgantown, W.Va. He was a graduate of the former St. Vincent Preparatory School, St. Vincent College and the University of Pittsburgh. During World War II, he enlisted in the Navy and was stationed in the Philippines.

He started teaching in 1953 at Park Terrace Junior High School in North Versailles. In 1958, he returned to St. Vincent Prep, then in 1962 to St. Vincent College, where he would remain for more than four decades.

"He'd come in with books that he'd been reading that were pertinent to the class, and he really got us fired up about reading and history," said Miller, a history professor at Lafayette College. "There was nothing loud and boisterous about him, but he really just took command of the class material. He was an amazing guy."

Miller dedicated his 2014 book about the Jazz Age in Manhattan to Mr. Manoli.

As a Seton Hill student, his wife, Anita, spent years trying to meet Mr. Manoli after seeing him in a roommate's yearbook.

"I saw this boy, Robert Manoli. I told her he was cute, but she said, 'You should see (his brother)Charles,' " his wife said. "She said all the girls were crazy about him, but he didn't pay attention, he just sat on his porch and read books. …

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