Colleges Focus on Students' Job Prep; as Students Return to Campuses This Month, Officials at Public and Private Universities Are Racing to Address a Growing Skills Gap in Western Pennsylvania, Where a Rapidly Aging Workforce Has Prompted Concerns about the Region's Economic Health. [Derived Headline]

By Erdley, Debra | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 29, 2016 | Go to article overview

Colleges Focus on Students' Job Prep; as Students Return to Campuses This Month, Officials at Public and Private Universities Are Racing to Address a Growing Skills Gap in Western Pennsylvania, Where a Rapidly Aging Workforce Has Prompted Concerns about the Region's Economic Health. [Derived Headline]


Erdley, Debra, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


As students return to campuses this month, officials at public and private universities are racing to address a growing skills gap in Western Pennsylvania, where a rapidly aging workforce has prompted concerns about the region's economic health.

The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education led the way abut five years ago as the 14 state-owned universities began assessing their programs in light of the state's workforce needs.

Now Seton Hill University will join the effort. A $500,000 grant from the Richard King Mellon Foundation will underwrite the establishment of an Office of Academic Innovation and Planning at the school.

Officials at the private Catholic university in Greensburg said the program will allow it to move quickly to address changing workforce needs in technology, health care and business.

Seton Hill Provost Susan Yochum said the school, which draws students largely from Western Pennsylvania, sees linking students to real-world work opportunities as part of the mission Mother Elizabeth Seton established: "to fit students for the world they are destined to live in."

"To have a center like this is perfect for ensuring students are in the right major with skills for the workplace, that they have a marketable degree with a liberal arts foundation," Yochum said.

Chad Amond, president of the Westmoreland County Chamber of Commerce, hailed Seton Hill's new focus.

"We certainly look at it as a good thing. The more institutions we have trying to row the boat in the right direction, the better off we all are," Amond said.

Retaining college graduates and ensuring that their skills match local needs will be critical as more baby boomers retire and the graying of the region accelerates, Amond added.

The Allegheny Conference for Community Development highlighted the need for such planning in a recent report, "Inflection Point: Supply, Demand and Future of Work in the Pittsburgh Region."

Although the 10-county area has 61 colleges, universities and trade schools, it retains only about 43 percent of those graduates. Unless something changes, researchers said the region could find itself with a critical shortage of well-trained workers in areas such as health care and information technology in the next decade.

Yochum said Seton Hill is responding to such needs with the launch of an undergraduate program in cyber security this spring and a move to begin offering adult degree programs in business, criminology and human services now offered on campus at night and on weekends, completely online.

The school is considering an online master's degree in nursing.

Yochum said the effort builds on the kind of initiative Seton Hill took when it partnered to bring the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine to Greesnburg in 2009.

Don Francis, executive director of the Association of Pennsylvania Independent Colleges and Universities, said many of the organization's 90 members, who range from small liberal arts colleges to large research institutions, have been cognizant of such needs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Colleges Focus on Students' Job Prep; as Students Return to Campuses This Month, Officials at Public and Private Universities Are Racing to Address a Growing Skills Gap in Western Pennsylvania, Where a Rapidly Aging Workforce Has Prompted Concerns about the Region's Economic Health. [Derived Headline]
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.