Pso Management, Musicians Get Points across Via Social Media

By Bloom, Elizabeth | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), September 2, 2016 | Go to article overview

Pso Management, Musicians Get Points across Via Social Media


Bloom, Elizabeth, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


The contract for the musicians of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is set to expire Sunday night, and while the symphony's management and musicians have agreed not to discuss the negotiations with the media, messages from both sides are getting across.

In the past several weeks, the musicians, members of Local 60-471 of the American Federation of Musicians, have ramped up their social media efforts and established a new website and newsletter. The tone of the musicians' online campaign generally has been positive, focusing on PSO players or orchestras that have found recent philanthropic success. By contrast, at a hearing for the Allegheny Regional Asset District this week, the orchestra's management offered a pessimistic assessment of the organization's finances in the years to come.

The musicians made a point during rehearsals at the Aspen Music Festival in Colorado in August, when they wore black-and-gold T-shirts that read "Musicians of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra," featuring a silhouette of the Pittsburgh skyline. The musicians posted photographs of themselves sporting the new threads on Twitter and Facebook, and they recently made the shirts available for sale to the public.

In essence, the musicians have established a brand that is independent of the organization at large. In the years since the recession, several musicians' unions have employed similar tactics as a way "to get the good word out" and counterbalance a negative narrative about the financial health of symphony orchestras, said Meredith Snow, chairwoman of the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians. In the case of labor disputes, developing an independent following can prove useful to musicians trying to garner public support.

Separately, Melia Tourangeau, the symphony's president and CEO since last summer, made the symphony's annual pitch for RAD funds on Monday at the Koppers Building. The symphony was seeking $1.4 million in operating funds and a smaller grant for capital costs.

There were a few bright spots: better ticket sales, a successful annual fund campaign, Ms. Tourangeau said.

But for the most part, she offered a bleak assessment of the PSO's financial outlook: The organization had a $1.5 million deficit for the fiscal year that ended Wednesday. Ms. Tourangeau was certain the symphony could balance its budget by next season were it not for the expiration or reorganization of two revenue streams that would sink the organization another $1. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pso Management, Musicians Get Points across Via Social Media
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.