The Perfect Brisket for Rosh Hashanah; Brisket and Rosh Hashanah Just Go Together. When I Was Growing Up, My Family Went to Services in the Morning and We All Anticipated Our Late Lunch. the Table Was Laden with Challah, Apples and Honey, Whole Pomegranates, Braised Vegetables, Kugels, Salad and, of Course, Brisket. [Derived Headline]

By Worthington, Diane Rossen | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 27, 2016 | Go to article overview

The Perfect Brisket for Rosh Hashanah; Brisket and Rosh Hashanah Just Go Together. When I Was Growing Up, My Family Went to Services in the Morning and We All Anticipated Our Late Lunch. the Table Was Laden with Challah, Apples and Honey, Whole Pomegranates, Braised Vegetables, Kugels, Salad and, of Course, Brisket. [Derived Headline]


Worthington, Diane Rossen, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Brisket and Rosh Hashanah just go together. When I was growing up, my family went to services in the morning and we all anticipated our late lunch. The table was laden with challah, apples and honey, whole pomegranates, braised vegetables, kugels, salad and, of course, brisket.

My mom's brisket was pretty simple: brisket, onions, ketchup and beer. It was so good. Through the years, I have tried my hand at different versions: brisket with wine and dried fruit, brisket with tomatoes and brown sugar, and brisket with autumn fruit. I also heard about a great brisket recipe by a man from New York. That was all I knew.

Then I met Nach Waxman.

The first time I met Waxman was at his amazing cookbook store in New York City. I had published my first book, "The Cuisine of California," and he graciously invited me to sign my books. There I learned that he was quite a cook himself. In fact, his brisket recipe had become famous and, coincidentally, was the recipe I had heard about.

This recipe is considered the go-to for knowledgeable brisket lovers. But what makes Waxman's brisket so special? The secret is what he did way before anyone else: He sliced the meat midway through cooking.

Cutting the brisket halfway through the cooking process assures that each slice of meat will be evenly flavored with the sauce. And since the slicing has been done, it's easy to serve. He credits his mother-in-law for teaching him that technique, which is called "interim slicing." I love that he has passed this technique down to the next generation.

In "The Brisket Book: A Love Story with Recipes" ($29.99, Andrews McMeel Publishing), I found this recipe that had been adapted from "The New Basics Cookbook." You'll find everything you might have wanted to know, and more, in this essential book for brisket lovers. This comforting potted beef braises tenderly and slowly in onion compote, with a flavor heightened by the addition of tomato paste and braised garlic cloves. And the tomato paste really adds an extra punch of flavor.

The key to tender brisket is the long, slow cooking process that keeps the meat from shrinking and helps the sweet onion compote bed encourage the beef to stay moist and tender. You can make this up to three days ahead so the flavors can develop. Just make sure to taste the sauce before you serve it to make sure to brighten the flavor, if need be. I like to serve this with sauteed green beans and noodle kugel or simple noodles.

Diane Rossen Worthington is the author of 18 cookbooks and an award-winning radio host. …

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The Perfect Brisket for Rosh Hashanah; Brisket and Rosh Hashanah Just Go Together. When I Was Growing Up, My Family Went to Services in the Morning and We All Anticipated Our Late Lunch. the Table Was Laden with Challah, Apples and Honey, Whole Pomegranates, Braised Vegetables, Kugels, Salad and, of Course, Brisket. [Derived Headline]
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