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The Record (Bergen County, NJ), October 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

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Train crash in Hoboken

Regarding "What's going on at NJ Transit?" (Page L-1, Sept. 25):

You recently reported on NJ Transit's board not meeting in public for some time. Then consider the major mismanagement of the NJ Transit train fleet during Superstorm Sandy.

Perhaps these issues and this recent deadly crash point toward serious organizational deficiencies within NJ Transit. It is certainly worth investigating.

Michael J. Falso

Wayne, Sept. 30

*

Regarding "High speed into chaos" (Page A-1, Sept. 30):

The Hoboken train crash is a tragic reminder that rail safety has to be a top priority.

Rail train safety has been the call of the Coalition to Ban Unsafe Oil Trains. This tragic crash of a commuter train and the derailments of trains carrying volatile Bakken crude oil through our communities and those of 25 million others are predictable. Congress has failed to fund the repair of rail and bridge infrastructure throughout the United States.

Congress has allowed interstate rail companies to inspect their own tracks and bridges and report to no one. Our coalition, along with Hackensack Riverkeeper, has been pleading with the Federal Railroad Administration to inspect the CSX rail bridge where the Overpeck Creek and the Hackensack River meet. This is a bridge in serious disrepair.

But repairs or replacement of bridges have been delayed by lack of funds as a result of the state Transportation Trust Fund stalemate. Plus, there are not many rail bridge inspectors.

The trains carrying oil that run through Bergen County, Jersey City and Newark on the way to refineries are tragedies waiting to happen. People must speak out to demand of candidates and elected officials to make rail safety a priority.

Paula Rogovin

Teaneck, Sept. 30

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Regarding "High speed into chaos" (Page A-1, Sept. 30):

Another train crash that could have been prevented if only a few million dollars had been spent. This, while money by the hundreds of billions of dollars is spent overseas.

Of the 20 candidates who ran for president this year, only Donald Trump campaigned on this issue. Whoever wins or loses, let's hope correcting this outrage is on the to-do list of the next administration.

Alan Lewis

Fair Lawn, Sept. 30

The race for president

The first presidential debate and the campaign so far has been disappointing and discouraging. My major concern is the lack of a candidate who can unite our nation.

Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama campaigned as "uniters." Unfortunately, at the end of their presidencies our nation was and is further divided.

The rhetoric and talking points of the major candidates accentuate our differences. Donald Trump's comments on Mexicans, Muslims, immigrants, women and his opponents are over the top. Hillary Clinton's categorization of half of Trump's supporters as "deplorables" is deplorable in and of itself.

Both candidates use politics to divide us by race, ethnicity, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, age, economic status and education to gain votes. The media is complicit in delivering their message, emphasizing what is most extreme.

The most obvious character trait lacking in the two candidates is humility. Humility allows you to listen to those who disagree with you rather than dismiss them. It also allows you to compromise with those who disagree with you and value the progress that results.

My fear is that whomever is elected, his or her presidency will begin with our nation more greatly divided and our federal government less likely to reach compromises on issues important to all of us.

Our choice is not binary. If enough voters chose another candidate or write in someone more acceptable to them, it will be more difficult for the eventual winner to declare a mandate and might make it more likely and practical for him or her to compromise and or choose a middle course. …

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