Clearing the Smoke on Maine Laws Related to Student Voting

By Cousins, Christopher | Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME), November 7, 2016 | Go to article overview

Clearing the Smoke on Maine Laws Related to Student Voting


Cousins, Christopher, Bangor Daily News (Bangor, ME)


AUGUSTA, Maine -- Republican Gov. Paul LePage warned college students from outside Maine who are studying here that registering as a Maine voter comes with strings attached.

LePage issued a news release Monday to inform students attending colleges in Maine that state government will check up on them following the election. The release came after Clayton Spencer, president of Bates College in LePage's hometown of Lewiston, alleged that fliers left Saturday on campus were designed to frighten students from voting in Tuesday's election.

"After the election, we will do everything we can that is allowed under state and federal law to verify college students who voted here are following Maine law," said LePage, whose message was also a thinly veiled attack on Democrats and the long-simmering dispute between Republicans and Democrats about access to the polls.

"Democrats for decades have encouraged college students from out of state to vote in Maine, even though there is no way to determine whether these college students also voted in their home states," said LePage.

There are no recent cases of that type of two-state voter fraud on record as having been prosecuted in Maine. A two-month investigation into alleged student voter fraud in 2011, launched by Republican Secretary of State Charlie Summers, turned up no evidence that it has occurred in Maine.

But that did not quell political sniping on the eve of Tuesday's voting.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Maine said Monday that LePage is trying to intimidate people who are studying in Maine.

"The governor's statement seems designed to make college students afraid to vote," said ACLU of Maine legal director Zachary Heiden in a written statement. "Voter intimidation and harassment is illegal and we call on the Department of Justice to investigate the intent of the governor's comments."

The law

Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap said registering to vote in Maine sets an "expectation that you obtain a Maine driver's license and do other public business as a Maine resident.

"However, whether an individual obtains a Maine driver's license or not has no impact on your ability to exercise your right to vote," said Dunlap in a written statement. "There is no statutory connectivity between motor vehicle law and election law, and no one should be deterred from voting because of other aspects of residency found in other titles of Maine law."

Dunlap did not immediately respond to a question about what his office, which also oversees motor vehicle registration and driver's licensing, could do to ensure that voters new to the state were complying with other residency requirements.

Voter registration checklist

The process for college students from out of state is the same as for everyone else.

-- United States citizenship is required.

-- You must be at least 17 years old to register and must be at least 18 years of age to vote in a general election.

-- You must have established residency in the municipality where you plan to vote. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Clearing the Smoke on Maine Laws Related to Student Voting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.