Do You Have Egalitarian Parenting Syndrome?

By Rosemond, John | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), December 4, 2016 | Go to article overview

Do You Have Egalitarian Parenting Syndrome?


Rosemond, John, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


Some of the sources that inform today's parenting do not come immediately to mind when one thinks of raising children.

Take Karl Marx (1818-1883), for example. Along with his buddy Friedrich Engels, Marx articulated the fundamental principles of communism. He proposed that capitalism was an economic and social system that exploited and oppressed labor and kept the "masses" in a perpetual state of subjugation and misery.

Marx was the unspoken godfather of the late-1960s/early-1970s psychological parenting revolution. The revolutionaries - mental health professionals, mostly - proposed that traditional parenting oppresses the "natural" (aka "inner") child. This myth gave rise to a relationship-based, feeling-based, self-esteem-based parenting and child-rearing in America has been on the skids ever since.

Today, the typical American parent practices - and, to be fair, unwittingly - what I call Egalitarian Parenting (aka Postmodern Psychological Parenting). The parents in question lack confidence in the legitimacy of their authority and behave, therefore, as if the parent-child relationship is constituted of equals.

The general result is children who are flush with esteem for their "bad" selves but deficient in respect for their elders. Fifty years ago, such children were called, among other things, insufferable.

Because Egalitarian Parenting Syndrome is a form of co- dependency, its practitioners are usually clueless. Therefore, I have devised the following short questionnaire to help them self- identify (or not). The directions are simple: Answer each statement with either Mostly True, Somewhat True or Not True. …

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