Associated Press [Derived Headline]

Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 31, 2016 | Go to article overview

Associated Press [Derived Headline]


Associated Press

Today is Saturday, Dec. 31, the 366th and final day of 2016.

Highlights in History

In 1775: during the Revolutionary War, the British repulsed an attack by Continental Army generals Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold at Quebec; Montgomery was killed.

In 1879: Thomas Edison first publicly demonstrated his electric incandescent light in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

In 1904: New York's Times Square saw its first New Year's Eve celebration, with an estimated 200,000 people in attendance.

In 1942: Frank Sinatra opened a singing engagement at New York's Paramount Theater.

In 1946: President Harry S. Truman officially proclaimed the end of hostilities in World War II.

In 1951: the Marshall Plan expired after distributing more than $12 billion in foreign aid.

In 1969: Joseph A. Yablonski, an unsuccessful candidate for the presidency of the United Mine Workers of America, was shot to death with his wife and daughter in their Clarksville, Pennsylvania, home by hit men acting at the orders of UMWA president Tony Boyle.

In 1972: Major League baseball player Roberto Clemente, 38, was killed when a plane he'd chartered and was traveling on to bring relief supplies to earthquake-devastated Nicaragua crashed shortly after takeoff from Puerto Rico.

In 1978: Taiwanese diplomats struck their colors for the final time from the embassy flagpole in Washington, D.C., marking the end of diplomatic relations with the United States.

In 1985: singer Rick Nelson, 45, and six other people were killed when fire broke out aboard a DC-3 that was taking the group to a New Year's Eve performance in Dallas.

In 1986: 97 people were killed when fire broke out in the Dupont Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Three hotel workers later pleaded guilty in connection with the blaze.)

In 1991, representatives of the government of El Salvador and rebels reached agreement at the United Nations on a peace accord to end 12 years of civil war.

In 2001, New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani (joo-lee-AH'-nee) spent his final day in office praising police, firefighters, and other city employees in the wake of 9/11, and said he had no regrets about returning to private life.

Ten years ago: The death toll for Americans killed in the Iraq war reached 3,000. Hundreds of Iraqis flocked to the village of Ouja (OO'-juh) where Saddam Hussein was born to see the deposed leader buried in a religious compound 24 hours after his execution. Ordinary Americans paid their respects to former President Gerald R. Ford, walking slowly by his flag-covered casket in the U.S. Capitol.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama signed a wide-ranging defense bill into law despite having "serious reservations" about provisions that regulated the detention, interrogation and prosecution of suspected terrorists. A NASA GRAIL probe fired its engine and slipped into orbit around the moon in the first of two back-to-back arrivals over the New Year's weekend.

One year ago: Belgian authorities announced the arrest of a 10th person in connection with the Nov. 2015 bloodbath in Paris. A towering inferno engulfed a 63-story luxury hotel in Dubai as officials went ahead with a massive New Year's fireworks display (there were no serious injuries reported). …

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