Sports History

Charleston Gazette Mail, January 20, 2017 | Go to article overview

Sports History


Jan. 20

1891 - The International YMCA in Springfield, Mass. is the site of the first official basketball game. Peach baskets were used, but it wasn't until 1905 that someone removed the baskets' bottoms. 1937 - Nels Stewart of the New York Americans becomes the NHL's all- time scorer with his 270th goal in a 4-0 victory over the Montreal Canadiens.

1952 - George Mikan scores 61 points, a career-high, to lead the Minneapolis Lakers to a 91-81 double-overtime victory over the Rochester Royals.

1968 - Elvin Hayes scores 39 points to lead Houston to a 71-69 victory and end UCLA's 47-game winning streak. A regular-season record 52,693 fans attend the game at the Houston Astrodome.

1970 - Cincinnati's Tom Van Arsdale and Phoenix's Dick Van Arsdale are the first brothers to play in the same NBA All-Star game. Dick scores eight points for the West team, while Tom scores five for the East, which wins the game 142-135 at Philadelphia.

1980 - President Carter announces the U.S. Olympic team will not participate in the Summer Olympics in Moscow to protest the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan the previous month.

1980 - Terry Bradshaw passes for 309 yards and sets two passing records to help the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Los Angeles Rams 31- 19 and become the first team to win four Super Bowls.

1985 - Joe Montana passes for a Super Bowl record 331 yards and three touchdowns to lead the San Francisco 49ers to a 38-16 victory over the Miami Dolphins. Roger Craig scores a record three touchdowns.

1996 - Rudy Galindo, in the biggest upset in decades, wins the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, earning two perfect marks along the way. …

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