Wacky Prop Bets Popular Offshoot of Super Bowl Wagering

By Nowak, Dan | New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), February 2, 2017 | Go to article overview

Wacky Prop Bets Popular Offshoot of Super Bowl Wagering


Nowak, Dan, New Haven Register (New Haven, CT)


Over 30 years ago, in an effort to make the Super Bowl interesting for the novice and non-football fans, Las Vegas sports books developed the prop bet.

As the popularity of the prop bet grew, online betting sites added prop bets to their Super Bowl wagering. While Nevada state law dictates that casinos can only offer prop bets on game-related scenarios, the real wacky prop bets are offered online. It should be noted online sports betting is illegal in the United States.

How the prop betting works in Nevada is if a wager is listed as - 150, you wager $150 to make $100. If it is listed as +150, you wager $100 to make $150. Most online sites use odds to determine payoffs.

The most popular Super Bowl prop bet in Las Vegas is will the pre- game coin toss be heads or tails (heads and tails are both -102)? Will New England or Atlanta use the coach's challenge first (New England is -110 and Atlanta is -110)? Will either team score in the first 6[1/2] minutes of the game (yes is -140, no is +120)?

Among the prop bets online at SportsBettingDime.com: Which Anheuser-Busch brand ad will run first, Budweiser (6-5), Bud Light (3-2), Busch (12-1) or Michelob Ultra (11-1)? Odds that Lady Gaga's belly button will be visible during her halftime performance (5-8). Odds that Joe Buck will be clean shaven for the Super Bowl broadcast (10-1).

These are just some of the many popular Super Bowl-related prop bets that you can wager on in Nevada or online betting sites. When Las Vegas first rolled out prop bets about 30 years ago, the wagers represented less than 5 percent of the overall Super Bowl betting in Las Vegas. Six years ago it represented 20-25 percent of the overall wagering. Westgate Las Vegas Race and Superbook director Jay Kornegay develops the most prop bets each year and said their popularity has skyrocketed.

Two years ago, he set a Nevada single-casino record with 353 prop bets. Last year he broke that record with 392 prop bets and this year's record is at 399.

"We always add a few new prop bets so we're breaking the record for number of prop bets every year," Kornegay said. "The props represent about 55-60 percent of all the Super Bowl bets now. Guests are more comfortable each and every year with betting the props. They really enjoy them."

Other in-game prop bets at the Westgate Las Vegas Race and Superbook include:

Will Tom Brady thrown an interception (yes +130, no -150)? …

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