The Westmoreland to Host 'Poetry out Loud'; the Compelling Words of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Emily Dickinson, William Wordsworth, Edgar Allan Poe and William Shakespeare Are among the Choices of Participants to Recite at the Poetry out Loud Regional Finals on Feb. 4 at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg. [Derived Headline]

By Harrop, Joanne Klimovich | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 2, 2017 | Go to article overview

The Westmoreland to Host 'Poetry out Loud'; the Compelling Words of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Emily Dickinson, William Wordsworth, Edgar Allan Poe and William Shakespeare Are among the Choices of Participants to Recite at the Poetry out Loud Regional Finals on Feb. 4 at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg. [Derived Headline]


Harrop, Joanne Klimovich, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


The compelling words of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Emily Dickinson, William Wordsworth, Edgar Allan Poe and William Shakespeare are among the choices of participants to recite at the Poetry Out Loud Regional Finals on Feb. 4 at The Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg.

Since 2005, Poetry Out Loud has grown to reach more than three million high school students and 50,000 teachers from 10,000 schools in every state, Washington D.C., the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

"The arts are the great equalizer in education," says Gayle Cluck, of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and Poetry Out Loud manager. "Students learn better when they are exposed to the arts. Kids in under-served communities who have an art experience have better attendance and do better across the board academically. We celebrate their courage and poise."

Students must recite their poem from memory. All poems must be selected from the Poetry Out Loud anthology, which is updated every summer.

The event is free, but registering online is recommended.

The museum has been happy to participate in this competition for seven years, says Maureen Zang, public programs coordinator. Happenings like this are part of being a community partner and the poetry competition is a way to bring other art forms to the public, Zang says.

"Poetry is definitely a form of art and literature," Zang says. "We often ask children in galleries to write haikus about a piece of art they see. So this is all a natural connection."

This is one of 15 regional sites in Pennsylvania, which must decide winners by Feb. 14. Each region will send a winner to Harrisburg March 5 and 6 with the hopes of advancing to the finals in April in Washington D.C..

Participants are judged on physical presence, voice and articulation, dramatic appropriateness, evidence of understanding and overall performance. Each winner at the state level receives $200 and an all-expenses paid trip with an adult chaperone to the national championship. …

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The Westmoreland to Host 'Poetry out Loud'; the Compelling Words of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Emily Dickinson, William Wordsworth, Edgar Allan Poe and William Shakespeare Are among the Choices of Participants to Recite at the Poetry out Loud Regional Finals on Feb. 4 at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg. [Derived Headline]
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