Letters to the Editor

AZ Daily Star, February 9, 2017 | Go to article overview

Letters to the Editor


Burges' refugee bill is un-Christian

SB 1468, sponsored by Sen.Judy Burges, R-Sun City, and co- sponsored by Mark Finchem and Vince Leach, Republican representatives in District 11 (Oro Valley and adjacent areas), seeks to remove Arizona from the U.S. refugee program and fine charities $1,000 per day for every refugee they assist in the state.According to the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, the odds of being killed in a terrorist attack committed by a refugee on U.S. soil is 1 in 3.6 billion per year. None of the recent mass shootings, Sandy Hook, Fort Hood, San Bernardino or Orlando, was committed by a refugee. Refugees are the most thoroughly vetted population of travelers to the U.S., subject to a stringent process that takes 18 to 24 months and involves scrutiny from eight U.S. and international security agencies.According to Matthew 22:39, Jesus said, "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself."

SB 1468 is mean-spirited, un-Christian and cowardly. It should be recognized as such and defeated.

Timothy Fagan

Oro ValleyOn immigration law, US has its regretsIn 1882 the Chinese Exclusion Act effectively stopped all immigration from China. In 1924, we excluded all Asians from becoming naturalized citizens. Finally, in 1944, the first Chinese immigrants were allowed to become U.S. citizens and in 1952 Japanese immigrants were allowed to become U.S. citizens. In 1942 we interred approximately 110,000 people of Japanese descent, and 62 percent of them were U.S. citizens.The common thread in all of these instances is the exclusion of a particular group based on race or geographic origin. If we could revisit these laws and discriminatory actions, we would not do the same again. All of these actions are regrettable.

So, President Trump, be more vigorous and thorough in vetting potential immigrants, monitor them in the U.S. if any doubts arise after they become residents, but do not ban any group from entering the U.S. Discrimination of a group for any reason is un-American as well as being ethically and morally wrong. Fear is not an American value.

Richard McGann

FoothillsPetty language from the presidentI was disgusted by President Trump's reference to Judge Robart as "that so-called judge." He's using the same disrespectful, denigrating, petty language that has been his trademark from the start. …

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