Christians to Unite during Anniversary; Separated by Centuries of Enmity, Lutherans and Catholics Are Using the 500th Anniversary of the Start of the Protestant Reformation to Ask Forgiveness of Each Other and Focus on Things They Have in Common. [Derived Headline]

By Huba, Stephen | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 19, 2017 | Go to article overview

Christians to Unite during Anniversary; Separated by Centuries of Enmity, Lutherans and Catholics Are Using the 500th Anniversary of the Start of the Protestant Reformation to Ask Forgiveness of Each Other and Focus on Things They Have in Common. [Derived Headline]


Huba, Stephen, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Separated by centuries of enmity, Lutherans and Catholics are using the 500th anniversary of the start of the Protestant Reformation to ask forgiveness of each other and focus on things they have in common.

On April 4, Lutherans and Catholics from Western Pennsylvania will gather in Pittsburgh for an "Evening of Repentance" tied to the Reformation anniversary. While not quite a celebration, the event is a commemoration of a seminal moment in the life of Western Christianity -- a family squabble that led to the further fracturing of Christianity in the early 1500s.

"Any time you have a division in the Christian faith, that's going to sadden Jesus himself," Bishop David A. Zubik of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh said.

Zubik is one of four Christian hierarchs participating in the prayer service at St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cathedral in Munhall. He will be joined by Bishop Edward C. Malesic of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Greensburg, Metropolitan William C. Skurla of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh and Bishop Kurt F. Kusserow of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America's Southwestern Pennsylvania Synod.

"There are real divisions," Malesic said, "but any of the divisions that are caused by human sinfulness we want to repent of. We want to fulfill the prayer of Jesus that we be one."

The Lenten prayer service will be the culmination of months of work in which Catholic and Lutheran leaders have been looking for ways to "increase mutual understanding, reconciliation and more visible unity of the Church" in light of the 500th anniversary, according to a letter signed by all four bishops.

In the letter, they encourage clergy and laity to join them at the service and for a light Lenten meal afterward. The service was rescheduled from March 14 because of weather. It will be streamed live online at www.StJohnsByzantineCathedral.com/cathedral/live.

Lutherans trace their origins to Martin Luther's protest of a Catholic Church that he, an Augustinian monk, felt had become corrupt. Luther's posting of the 95 Theses in 1517 started as an attempt to reform the church from within but eventually resulted in schism.

"Both Lutherans and Catholics said things that were condemnations against each other. Recent statements have said these condemnations are no longer valid, that we have moved from conflict to communion," said Bishop Emeritus Donald McCoid of the ELCA's Southwestern Pennsylvania Synod.

McCoid, co-chairman of the "Evening of Repentance" planning committee, has been active in the cause of Lutheran-Catholic dialogue and Lutheran-Orthodox dialogue since 2007. Prior to being bishop for the Southwestern Pennsylvania Synod, he was pastor of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church in Latrobe.

McCoid served on the joint Lutheran-Catholic task force that developed "Declaration on the Way: Church, Ministry and Eucharist," a 2015 document that detailed 32 points of agreement between Lutherans and Catholics -- as well as 15 "doctrinal differences of varying gravity," including ordination, papal authority and the Eucharist. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Christians to Unite during Anniversary; Separated by Centuries of Enmity, Lutherans and Catholics Are Using the 500th Anniversary of the Start of the Protestant Reformation to Ask Forgiveness of Each Other and Focus on Things They Have in Common. [Derived Headline]
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.