Americans Reconsider Value of Health Care as Costs Skyrocket

By Rukeyser, Louis | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 4, 1986 | Go to article overview

Americans Reconsider Value of Health Care as Costs Skyrocket


Rukeyser, Louis, THE JOURNAL RECORD


NEW YORK - Can any amount of health care be too much?

We Americans, with our renowned capacity for wretched excess, historically would have answered that question with a resounding ""No!'' But now, with an estimated $420 billion a year going just to pay off the nation's health-care tab, an unusual coalition is forming around the idea that enough's enough - and that some medical bills these days would make you sick.

In the forefront of this movement are some of the leaders of corporate America, which in 1984 shelled out $87 billion for group health insurance alone. Suddenly, cost-consciousness about this vaulting bill is everywhere.

It is, at best, a deeply sensitive issue - and few companies want to appear as heartless skinflints, consigning their employees to less than adequate care. Everybody (including the top corporate officers) wants to feel secure about the help that will be forthcoming if illness strikes.

But the feeling that the price of implementing that care has burgeoned out of proportion to the added benefits has led to major new cost-cutting efforts - involving both the carrot and the stick.

Medical sources say many companies, in order to trim their health-insurance premiums, are not just paying for second and third medical opinions, but also influencing which opinion the patient accepts. Corporate America not only exhorts doctors and hospitals to keep treatment to the necessary minimum, but also is beginning to refuse to pay fully for days and procedures they feel are unwarranted- even if the patient's doctor insists that the treatment is necessary.

Here are some specific examples of recent changes in corporate health-insurance programs:

- IBM workers must pay 40 percent of the first day's room charge during a hospital stay, plus a variable deductible of $150 for those earning $50,000 or less and .75 percent of annual salary for the higher-paid employees.

- Quaker Oats doles out cash bonuses to its employees if the annual medical bill for its work force is below the company's expectations.

- Lockheed requires new employees to enroll in less-costly health maintenance programs (HMOs) rather than traditional arrangements with a personal physician.

In fact, many would-be patients are surrendering frequent doctor visits to avoid increasing out-of-pocket expenses caused by less-comprehensive coverage and higher deductibles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Americans Reconsider Value of Health Care as Costs Skyrocket
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.