First National Bank Cuts 60 Employees

By Lou Anne Wolfe And Max Nichols | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 20, 1986 | Go to article overview

First National Bank Cuts 60 Employees


Lou Anne Wolfe And Max Nichols, THE JOURNAL RECORD


A reduction of 60 employees as part of an overall reorganization by the First National Bank and Trust Co. of Oklahoma City was announced Wednesday by J.G. Cairns Jr., chairman, president and chief executive officer.

The reduction, which was made across the board in various departments, was a result of recommendations by Furash & Co. of Washington, D.C., a management consulting firm for financial institutions, it was reported.

The announcement followed a recent confirmation that one executive vice president and five senior vice presidents had left the bank on March 7. There were no vice presidents among the 60 emloyees laid off Wednesday, it was reported.

After the reductions Wednesday, First National had 768 employees.

"These actions were taken after a painstaking analysis of our current and planned staff requirements in light of the economic conditions of the market in which we operate," said Cairns. He also ischairman and chief executive of First Oklahoma Bancorporation Inc., parent company of First National.

"While we deeply regret the need to eliminate positions," said Cairns, "these measures were judged necessary due to the current and forecasted economic climate of the Southwest.

"It is no secret that these challenging times require some very difficult decisions. Recognizing this makes those decisions no less difficult."

Cairns, former president of Peoples National Bank of Seattle, was named chairman on Jan. 6 of First National Bank of Oklahoma City and the holding company. Both had suffered for three years from the oil and gas slump, which has effected energy-lending institutions throughout the Southwest.

Cairns succeeded Edward C. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

First National Bank Cuts 60 Employees
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.