Interviews Provide Key to Success in Hunting for Job

By Belt, Joy Reed | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 2, 1986 | Go to article overview

Interviews Provide Key to Success in Hunting for Job


Belt, Joy Reed, THE JOURNAL RECORD


When you're hunting for a new job, the key to success is being interviewed. Unless you get interviewed, you can't get a job. It's as simple as that.

Many job-hunters send out resumes and wait for potential employers to contact them. You can score this way, but it's the slowest and least effective way to do it. You can dramatically increase the number of interviews - and hence your chances of landing a job - by becoming active instead of passive. There are several proven ways to generate interviews.

The help-wanted ads are certainly a possible source of leads, but remember that there will be more competition for those openings than for any other and that only about 20 percent of jobs are foundthere. To generate more interviews, instead of simply answering the ad, research the company a little bit, find out who will be your superior if you get the job and write him or her as if you hadn'tseen the ad. That way you'll come in at a slightly different angle from all the other candidates, and there's a better chance you'll be noticed.

Search also the "business for sale" ads and follow up on those that interest you. When a business changes hands, the new owner will be open to hiring new employees. Follow the news of promotions inthe business section of the paper. Most people who move up into a new slot leave their old one behind for somebody else to move into. Another way of using the newspaper is to follow the business pages looking for trends that might develop into employment opportunities.

If you'd like to relocate, or would be willing to, evaluate opportunities in other cities. Subscribe to those newspapers. Buy those telephone books (your local telephone company will get them for you and they're surprisingly inexpensive).

Since nearly 80 percent of all jobs are found through referrals, organize your friends and relatives to search for you and report any leads they turn up. Use your business acquaintances in the sameway. Anybody you would list as a reference should be apprised of your job search and invited to help.

Find a career adviser and work with him or her. Sign up with employment agencies, but unless you're desperate, limit yourself to the ones that advertise "fees paid."

There's no reason you can't simply pick some companies you'd like to work for and write or call their personnel departments. This takes a good marketing letter or telemarketing skills, both of which you can develop. They may not have openings now, but when they do, your application will already be on file; and if you look good, they may decide to save the money, time and effort of even advertising the position at all.

If there's one company you'd like to work for more than any other, launch a campaign. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Interviews Provide Key to Success in Hunting for Job
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.