Reagan's Supreme Court Nominations / Conservative Rehnquist Pens Polished Opinions Respected by Opponents

By Stephen Engelberg, N. Y. T. N. S. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, June 21, 1986 | Go to article overview

Reagan's Supreme Court Nominations / Conservative Rehnquist Pens Polished Opinions Respected by Opponents


Stephen Engelberg, N. Y. T. N. S., THE JOURNAL RECORD


WASHINGTON - Justice William H. Rehnquist, nominated Tuesday to be chief justice of the United States by President Reagan, is a conservative jurist whose polished opinions have won grudging respect even from those who oppose his views.

Rehnquist, 61 years old, was named to the court by President Nixon in 1971 after serving for two years in the Justice Department as head of the Office of Legal Counsel. As one of the government's chief legal strategists, he articulated administration's policies on such issues as obscenity, wiretapping and defendants' rights.

In an interview last year with The New York Times Magazine, he said that when he was appointed, he saw himself as a counterweight to the direction taken by the court under Chief Justice Earl Warren.

""I felt that at the time I came on the court, the boat was kind of keeling over in one direction,'' he said. ""Interpreting my oath as I saw it, I felt that my job was, where those sort of situations arose, to kind of lean the other way.''

In his early days, he wrote stinging one-man dissents that attacked the court's positions on such issues as women's rights and school desegregation.

More recently, with the appointment by President Reagan of Sandra Day O'Connor, his classmate at Stanford Law School, and shifts in the thinking of other colleagues, Rehnquist has found himself increasingly in the majority.

The most frequent complaint about Rehnquist voiced by academic critics is that his accomplished writing style obscures disingenuous arguments and the twisting of facts to fit his viewpoint.

In his interview last year, Rehnquist said such assertions were not ""well founded.'' He said it was the academics who were being disingenuous, noting that a 1972 poll showed 85 percent of law school faculty members favored George McGovern, the Democratic presidential candidate.

""You have to say, based on the law of averages, the author is going to start with a predisposition against a lot of my ideas,'' he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reagan's Supreme Court Nominations / Conservative Rehnquist Pens Polished Opinions Respected by Opponents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.