State Film Business Topped $18.8 Million in '87 / for Oklahoma Production Firms

By Carter, Kim | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 8, 1987 | Go to article overview

State Film Business Topped $18.8 Million in '87 / for Oklahoma Production Firms


Carter, Kim, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Film and video production resulted in an $18.8 million to $21 million business for Oklahoma independent production companies and television production facilities in 1986, according to results from an Oklahoma Film Office survey.

About 44 percent of the total revenues generated from film and video production last year - between $8.4 million and $9.3 million - was created by out-of-state contracts, the office's 1986 Annual Report said.

The Oklahoma Film Office 1986 Annual Report is the first of its kind for the industry in this state. It compiles the results from two surveys: one sent to 105 production companies and 20 television stations in the state, and the second sent to 143 advertising agencies. A 32.8 percent response rate was achieved from the television/production survey and an 18.1 percent response was received from advertising agencies.

A research subcomittee, which conducted the survey, estimated between $18.8 million and $21 million was received by independent production companies and television production facilities.

Neil Dikeman Jr., associate director of the Center for Economic and Management Research at the University of Oklahoma, said the response from production facilties represented an "excellent return," according to the report.

Despite the small percentage of advertising agencies responding, the subcommittee estimated $11.5 million was spent by advertising agencies on production in Oklahoma during the year.

Commercials comprised 74.5 percent of all film and video productions in Oklahoma made during 1986, according to the report. Educational productions comprised 6.4 percent of the total; video publishing, 5.9 percent; audio-visual, 5.4 percent; industrial, 4.4 percent; feature/television specials, 2.1 percent and documentaries, 1.3 percent.

According to Mary Nell Clark, director of the office, the revenue figures from the survey do not include `multipliers' used in many other states.

Multipliers show the impact of production dollars as they move through the economy.

"The real dollar impact of film and video on the state's economy continues to prove that this can be a viable industry for Oklahoma to pursue," Clark said.

The last year proved the film and video production in a growth industry, Clark said.

"A number of people in business feel like 1986 was a good year for them," she commented. "I feel it (1987) will be a good year for us, both from an in-state perspective and bringing in out-of-state producers."

Clark anticipates revenues from the industry will increase in 1987.

Filmmaking has traditionally been based in the large media centers of New York and Los Angeles. Audiences, however, are more sophisticated now, the report said, and producers are attempting to lower production costs, bringing about a trend of more films being shot on location.

With the evolution of a local film and video production industry, the Oklahoma Film Industry Task Force was formed in 1972 under the Oklahoma Department of Tourism and Recreation. …

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