Time Is Basic Difference in 3 Hazardous Waste Acts

By Truby, Wib | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 7, 1987 | Go to article overview

Time Is Basic Difference in 3 Hazardous Waste Acts


Truby, Wib, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The handling of hazardous waste is a very complex issue in our society.

While there are a wide variety of state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to hazardous waste, the two most visible laws are the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund) of 1980.

The basic difference in these acts is one of time. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulates hazardous wastes from "cradle-to-grave" or, in other words, from generation to final disposal of hazardous waste.

Superfund is designed to clean up hazardous substance spills and disposal problems, principally at abandoned hazardous waste sites. Both of these laws were enacted in a flurry of activity during the closing days of Congressional sessions.

They therefore have caused considerable controversy among regulators, the regulated and environmental groups. Subsequent legislative and regulatory amendments have cleared the confusion somewhat, but not entirely.

While most who are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act are conversant with the requirements and liabilities, Superfund often affects parties with no experience with the regulatory agencies and who are, therefore, quite justifiably confused.

For instance, most of the major provisions of Superfund are tied to the definition of "hazardous substances". While there are close to 700 substances listed as hazardous under Superfund, the Evironmental Protection Agency has taken the position that any material may be listed if it contains constituents that are hazardous.

Further, the Evironmental Protection Agency has the authority to respond to the release or the threat of release of a "pollutant or contaminant which may present an imminent and substantial danger to the public health or welfare". The terms pollutant and contaminant have been variously defined to include anything which may cause disease in any organism in the environment.

While this language appears to give the agency great latitude, in fact they have been very cautious in their approach. Although various figures are reported, approximately 40 sites were cleaned during the first five years of Superfund.

The first five-year authorization of $1.6 billion expired in September 1985. It was kept alive with month-to-month emergency appropriations until the fall of 1986.

The new reauthorization act appropriates up to $9 billion for the next five years with a mandate of final closure of 175 to 600 sites. This would seem to indicate an escalation of regulatory activity.

As the title of the act suggests, liability assessment is part of the basic nature of Superfund. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Time Is Basic Difference in 3 Hazardous Waste Acts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.