Railroads Finding Niche in Transportation Market / with Long Haul

By Case, Patti | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 9, 1987 | Go to article overview

Railroads Finding Niche in Transportation Market / with Long Haul


Case, Patti, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Mileage of the state's rail system has been reduced as a result of the changing nature of the market - as is the case nationally - but it apparently is not the end of the line for railroads.

Rather, railroads are finding the niche in the transportation market that only they can fill, according to Jerry Chambers, Oklahoma Department of Transportation representative.

"Local service is converting to trucks, but long haul will remain with trains, and in my opinion it will grow," Chambers said. He also predicts growth in the passenger sector.

In the meantime, employment has been on the down-turn for at least two decades, as railroads change their course, government figures indicate.

Oklahoma Department of Commerce figures indicate that from 1985 to 1986 alone, the decline in employment was 10 percent. Since 1960, 4,000 railroad workers have lost their jobs and the industry's share of total transportation employment has fallen from 22.8 percent to 5.9 percent since 1960, according to the department.

Meanwhile, wages in the transportation sector claimed by railroad employees declined from 23.6 percent to 8.4 percent between 1960 and 1985, according to the department.

The department shows wages in this segment of the transportation sector were $100.7 million in 1985.

Average annual growth rates have fallen by an average of 1.2 percent, compared with a decline of 1.5 percent per year for the entire country.

Employees of class one railroads as of March 1985 stood at 2,479, according to the Association of American Railroads, with average compensation for class one railroad employees at about $35,000 a year. Class one railroads are those that have $88 million in annual revenues or more.

Short haul - generally class three - employment and figures were not provided.

Disadvantages inherent to a system that cannot change routes easily as markets fluctuate, and poor rail car availability have contributed to the decline in railroads - all at a time when rates and energy efficiency are better by rail.

Even so, railroad mileage delcines are largely due to their changing role - not their pending demise, Chambers said.

"Rail service's role is - instead of the specific service to all types of commerce - to basically provide long haul service for bulk commodities: wheat, coal, automobiles, large out-sized commodities and heavy commodities.

"Local service once provided by railroad is provided by truck now," he said.

"But railroads still play a very major part in the total transportation system in this country," Chambers said. "As a rule of thumb, we normally move about 350,000 cars on the 4,400-mile rail system (in the state). About 22 million gross tons of cargo are moved into and out of the state by rail.

"As an indication, it would take about a million trucks to haul that cargo without the railroad," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Railroads Finding Niche in Transportation Market / with Long Haul
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.