Electronic Data Systems Reshape Modern Business

By Donoghue, William | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 18, 1988 | Go to article overview

Electronic Data Systems Reshape Modern Business


Donoghue, William, THE JOURNAL RECORD


What does your supermarket know that your banker doesn't?

That's a question many bankers are asking themselves these days, as supermarkets go electronic and banks are still swamped in seas of paper. For make no mistake, the Age of No Paper is coming fast, faster than many expected, and it is good for each and every one of us.

Most folks have been in a supermarket that uses scanners, those funny slots at the end of the moving belt. Inside the scanner is a glowing red light that ``sees'' the unit pricing code (UPC) bars on the box of cereal and rings it up on the cash register. That helps the store keep better track of inventory and helps prevent errors in ringing up sales.

And many folks now see automated teller machines (ATMs) in their supermarket, which allows them to withdraw cash to pay for their groceries.

But the large majority of shoppers still write checks for their groceries. That means, in most cases, you must have a check-cashing card from the supermarket. You must go to the courtesy booth and get the check pre-approved. Then you have to fill out the check and go through the checkout hassle.

Now, suppose you could use your bank card - the same one you use at the automated teller machine - to pay for your groceries? No more getting the check approved. You just go through the checkout, then present your card. The clerk passes it through a magnetic strip reader and taps in the total amount of your bill. You type in your personal identification number (PIN) on a keypad, and bingo! You're done.

What has happened here? Your checking account has been automatically ``debited.'' That means the amount of the grocery bill has been deducted from your checking account, just as if you'd written a check but without the hassle. It's called Electronic funds transfer, or EFT.

Electronic funds transfer is an outgrowth of a movement nationwide in business to use computers to get things done more quickly and efficiently. There's a big buzzword in business today: productivity.

Most see computers as the key business tool in improving productivity. It started in business with automating to eliminate paperwork. The more paper that has to be shuffled, the longer it takes to get things done. Thus began what is called electronic data interchange, or - if you can stand one more acronym in this column today - EDI. Let's take a quick look at how this came to pass.

Electronic data interchange began 15 years ago in the transportation industry as a better way to handle its immense amount of paperwork. It was the brainchild of Edward Guilbert, president of the Transportation Data Coordinating Committee in Washington, D.C. Guilbert says the idea occurred to him while he was traffic director for the Berlin airlift during World War II. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Electronic Data Systems Reshape Modern Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.