Insulating Walls Go Up on South Community Cancer Center

By Lewis, Constance | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 18, 1988 | Go to article overview

Insulating Walls Go Up on South Community Cancer Center


Lewis, Constance, THE JOURNAL RECORD


South Community Hospital, 1001 SW 44th St., has completed installation of four, one-foot thick, 25-ton steel insulating panels for the north and south walls that will house the newly acquired linear accelerator and existing cobalt machine at the hospital's Central Oklahoma Cancer Center, which is under construction.

Lowering and sandwiching the massive insulators into place with a crane between two parallel one-and-a-half foot thick concrete walls placed 16 inches apart was a delicate operation that allowed "a margin of error of just two inches on each side of the plate," said President Dan E. Tipton.

The action required optimal weather conditions and no wind, he added, explaining that December and January's inclement weather forced several postponements.

With the panels in place, the walls will measure over four feet across, and will thoroughly insulate the rest of the hospital environment against radiation "leakage," he said.

Tipton explained that, because the cancer center's new linear accelerator will be capable of generating X-ray beams with equivalencies of up to 10 million volts of electricity, such thoroughly protective insulation is essential. The steel plates will prevent any penetration of radiation through the walls.

The Central Oklahoma Cancer Center, scheduled to open next fall, will be the state's only free-standing outpatient cancer treatment facility west of Tulsa. Total cost of constructing the center, on the east side of South Community Hospital, will be approximately $3 million, he said.

Tipton pointed out that "every conceivable natural disaster was considered in the architectural design of the center. With piers for the walls going down a full 18 feet into solid bedrock and all walls a minimum of three feet thick, the building will be virtually tornado-proof, which is a real concern here in Oklahoma."

The architect for the project is Ralph Hester, with the Oklahoma City firm of J.H.B.R. The general contractor is Lambrecht Construction Co. of Bethany.

The linear accelerator is being manufactured by Varian, a California company, at a cost of $980,000. Before it can be installed, all major phases of construction in the area of the accelerator, including heating and air conditioning systems must be operational, he said. …

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Insulating Walls Go Up on South Community Cancer Center
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