Gains Achieved by U.S. in Energy Efficiency May Be Losing Ground / 15 Years after First Embargo

By Guy Darst, Ap | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 19, 1988 | Go to article overview

Gains Achieved by U.S. in Energy Efficiency May Be Losing Ground / 15 Years after First Embargo


Guy Darst, Ap, THE JOURNAL RECORD


the U.S. economy has stopped making gains in energy efficiency, according to experts who say the country may be losing ground.

Low prices account for the change, along with the fact the United States uses much more energy in comparison with other countries, analysts say.

The Energy Information Administration has revised 1987 figures to show efficiency unchanged from 1986, Jerry Lagace, an EIA economist, said.

It's the first time since 1976 that efficiency failed to improve.

Lagace noted that energy efficiency in the economy may have increased for the first quarter of the year over the 1987 quarter, but the 3.5 percent increase ``is so large that I don't believe it. This will probably be revised downward.''

Gains have been running at about 2.5 percent per year since the mid-1970s; EIA had expected future gains of about 1 percent per year. Preliminary 1987 statistics had indicated a 0.5 percent gain over 1986.

Lagace said further study is needed to pin down reasons. Growing exports of goods that take a lot of energy to produce, such as farm machinery, could be one reason. More driving is another possibility.

Efficiency has been improving throughout the industrial market economies since the 1960s, though the 1973 oil embargo greatly accelerated it. U.S. performance has been strong; some major U.S. competitors have done better.

``Energy is very cheap here,'' said Art Rosenfeld, director of the Center for Building Science at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at Berkeley, Calif.

``When you and I were growing up, they flared natural gas, and we built a lot of uninsulated houses because it was cheaper to burn more gas than to add insulation,'' Rosenfeld said in an interview.

Attitudes change slowly, so ``we haven't paid attention to investments that take five, six or seven years to pay back, like the Germans and the Japanese do,'' Rosenfeld said.

Europe and Japan use high gasoline taxes to raise revenue and hold down consumption, while the United States throughout the 1970s kept gasoline under price controls and required minimum mileage standards for automobiles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gains Achieved by U.S. in Energy Efficiency May Be Losing Ground / 15 Years after First Embargo
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.