Human Rights Abuses Deterred by Reagan / Says Abrams

By Knapschaefer, Johanna | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 13, 1989 | Go to article overview

Human Rights Abuses Deterred by Reagan / Says Abrams


Knapschaefer, Johanna, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The Reagan Administration's policy of durable improvements in Latin American has served as a deterrent to human rights abuses, said Elliott Abrams Thursday.

Abrams, U.S. assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs, spoke at the University of Oklahoma.

In contrast to the Carter Administration which focused on human rights, the Reagan Administration has had a clear and unifying policy with vigorous and effective focus on democracy, he said.

In 1981, 750 death squad murders a month took place in El Salvador, he said. Now the death figures have dropped to 2-4 percent of that, or about 30, he said.

Through the commitment of President Napoleon Duarte, El Salvador now has a special investigative and forensic unit to investigate crimes, he said.

Besides the reduction in the level of violence, Abrams said El Salvador now has a spectrum of parties from "pretty far left to right."

Supporters of Amnesty International USA and other students opposed to current American policy in Latin America quietly demonstrated outside of Holmberg Hall where Abrams spoke.

By sending clear messages to Latin American countries, the United States has also reduced the threat of political coups, Abrams said.

"In seven years and five weeks there have been no successful coups under an elected civilian president," he said.

The strong position of the United States may well have had a role in preventing a coup in Guatemala in May 1988, he said.

One of the most important contributions of the Reagan Administration's Latin America policy was that it "delegitimitized the importance of military dictatorship." "This was something only a conservative Republican Administration can do," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Human Rights Abuses Deterred by Reagan / Says Abrams
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.