Endowed Chair Program Boosts Ou Pathology Department

By Kilpatrick, Carol | THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 7, 1990 | Go to article overview

Endowed Chair Program Boosts Ou Pathology Department


Kilpatrick, Carol, THE JOURNAL RECORD


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Dr. Fred G. Silva II filled the Lloyd E. Rader Endowed Chair in Pathology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center when he returned to Oklahoma City in January 1989.

Since then, the Department of Pathology has recruited seven faculty members, increased the number of residents and fellows from four to 13 and increased extramural research funding 400 percent.

The quality of teaching also has increased 400 percent, said Silva. All four people nominated for the Aesculapian Award for excellence in teaching by the sophomore class were from the Department of Pathology. Six of the people in the department have won teacher of the year awards at six different institutions.

"And there are a whole lot of others that are just as fantastic," said Silva. "The endowed chair has done this for the department of pathology and the campus. We have put Oklahoma on the map in terms of renal pathology (a science dealing with disease of the kidney)."

The Lloyd E. Rader Endowed Chair in Pathology was established at the health sciences center in 1981 and was funded by the Department of Pathology, said Silva.

Through the endowed chair program, the state matches dollar-for-dollar private gifts to establish an endowed chair or professorship at any of the state's colleges or universities. More than $11 million in state and private funding is on deposit for the health sciences center for 14 chairs and one professorship.

The Oklahoma Legislature established the matching program in 1988 with an initial allocation of $15 million. Continued funding in 1989 and 1990 brings the funding to $26.5 million. Under the program, professorships are established at $500,000 and chairs at $1 million.

The Oklahoma business community has contributed more than $5 million to the health sciences center for the endowed chair program administered by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education.

The program helps attract great educators and researchers to the health sciences center, but the impact is multiplied by the faculty and researchers they are able to attract.

"When I returned to OU in 1989, it had changed from when I was in medical school," said Silva. "Research was starting to build, some really outstanding people had been recruited and state funding was available. …

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