Seeking Best Business Journal? Look to Front Edge

By Peters, Tom | THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 14, 1990 | Go to article overview

Seeking Best Business Journal? Look to Front Edge


Peters, Tom, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Subscribe to Business Week? Inc.? Forbes? Sure. Like me, you couldn't live without them.

The Harvard Business Review? Probably. The Economist? Maybe.

Gotcha time: I bet you don't subscribe to Target. CIO. Healthcare Forum Journal. If not, you're missing a bet.

I'll stick my neck out: Target, the quarterly publication of the Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME), is the best business magazine going today.

Consider Vol. 6, No. 3, the Fall 1990 issue. Motorola's Matt Van Wallene, controller in one of the firm's Mexican operations, wrote about ``Accounting Cycle Time Improvement''; his group now closes the month's books in eight hours, down from 50 hours two years ago.

Van Wallene didn't challenge Octavio Paz for the 1990 literature Nobel - but if your game is profit, his practical, jargon-free analysis will warm the cockles of your wallet.

Xerox, a 1989 Baldrige award winner, details its approach to quality management in this issue, too. And Northern Telecom reports on the triumph of self-directed work teams at its North Carolina customer-service center; one important measure of errors fell to just 81 in 1989 from 1,737 in 1987!

(The previous issue is just as good. My favorite: A detailed, insider's look at Florida Power & Light, the American utility that won Japan's ultra-prestigious Deming prize for quality in 1989.)

Target's parent, AME, offers a service as valuable as the magazine: on-site, multiday workshops at member organizations. The fall issue announces workshops at General Motors-Buick in Flint, Mich., 3M in Hutchinson, Minn., and Ranco in Plain City, Ohio. AME member dues - the only way to get Target - are $100; write to 380 W. Palatine Rd., Wheeling, IL 60090.

And now for something completely different. (And just as good!) CIO: The Magazine for Information Executives. Make no mistake, CIO, as in chief information officer, is for you and me, and maybe for some info execs as well.

Any who don't believe that information technology (IT) is changing everything should get out of management. When it comes to applying information technology, some firms are 10 years ahead - and many are losing the race. If you're not an intuitive ``IT type,'' you need case studies, with a mRight? If so, welcome to CIO.

The October 1990 issue provides a nitty-gritty, very readable story about Hyatt Hotels' information technology revolution. Another feature examines the construction of global networks. Then there's a terrific piece on EDI (electronic data interchange - I trust I didn't need to spell it out.) There's all sorts of nifty ``stuff'' in the departments and columns, too - including an attack on the author of this column; but, hey, if you're not being attacked, why be in business? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Seeking Best Business Journal? Look to Front Edge
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.