Employee Marketing Can Improve Productivity, Customer Relations

By Belt, Joy Reed | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 3, 1991 | Go to article overview

Employee Marketing Can Improve Productivity, Customer Relations


Belt, Joy Reed, THE JOURNAL RECORD


A competitive global economy has energized managers into finding new approaches to an old problem _ how to mold a company into a team.

The new trend of marketing a company to its own employees goes beyond involving them in goal-setting and decision-making, setting standards and holding periodic reviews. The concept is to sell the employees on management's view of the company with expectations that informed workers will become motivated to increase productivity.

The strategy is the same as applied by advertising and marketing professionals when they launch a campaign to market a client's services or products. They first define the strength and appeal of the product and then identify potential customer needs. The marketing campaign is focused toward bringing product and customer together.

When marketing a company internally to its employees, the product is management's overall vision and philosophy of the company itself. Once this perception is defined, it can be developed into an appropriate theme and communicated to employees.

As with an effective advertising campaign, the corporate message must be delivered consistently with repetition and continuity. Methods of accomplishing this include publications, orientation materials, training sessions, posters, videos, buttons and awards. Instead of conflicting messages being issued from various departments, all energy is focused on presenting a single image.

Randy Hunter, director of the Human Resources Group at Communicorp in Atlanta, has developed employee marketing programs for a retail chain, a regional bank, child care centers and other firms. He says, whether they know it or not, employees greatly influence customers' perception of a business and they can be trained to reflect the view of management.

Employee marketing can also be used in recruiting, developing policies for eliminating discrimination, sexual harassment, smoking and drug abuse.

Present indications are that it does increase productivity and improves customer relations.

QUESTION: I lost my job 13 months ago when my company relocated its offices. I have exhausted all business contacts, visited with a job counselor and had countless job interviews with no success. I am age 44, well educated and make a good impression on interviews. …

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