Barriors to Employment Still Confront Minorities

By Belt, Joy Reed | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 15, 1993 | Go to article overview

Barriors to Employment Still Confront Minorities


Belt, Joy Reed, THE JOURNAL RECORD


A recent special report on minority recruitment from the National Business Employment Weekly indicates that minorities are still facing barriers in hiring in general and particularly during the current recession.

Statistics provided by the report are indeed informative: the unemployment rate for black Americans in June 1992 was 14.9 percent. For white counterparts, the rate was half that at 6.8 percent. Hispanic unemployment was 12.1 percent. The statistics came from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Additionally, the National Urban League reported that for the third quarter of last year compared with the same period of the previous year, unemployment for black managers and executives increased three times greater than unemployment for white managers and executives.

One myth related to minority hiring perceived by white managers is that blacks have an unfair advantage in the job market because of affirmative action hiring. The truth is that although more employers are hiring minorities, the numbers relative to overall employment do not support the myth.

Additionally, minorities are often limited to positions specifically targeted to minorities.

There are several positive areas for minorities in the market, however. The demand for minorities appears to be highest in engineering, computer specialties and sales and marketing. Topmost on the sought-after list are minorities who have a combination of technical and managerial skills.

Unfortunately, the tendency of companies to fire first whom they last hired means that minority gains in hiring are set back by difficulty in remaining on the job long enough to accrue seniority, as a whole.

One of the most promising fields for minority hiring remains in health care, according to Toby Thompkins, a manager at Baxter International in Deerfield, Illinois.

Thompkins asserts that there is a need for persons who can deal with perceptions and stereotypes in understanding other people and in helping them compassionately. He said that the growing home health-care industry provides job opportunities for blacks, Hispanics and Asians, particularly in urban settings as employees go directly into patients' homes.

Other good general advice to minority job seekers is to target small businesses as well as companies with a good track record of minority hiring. Minorities must develop and use networks of contacts and become involved in professional organizations. Membership in the latter, listed on a resume, may be a useful and subtle way to draw an employer's attention to the minority applicant.

Finally, a well-constructed and nourished network can certainly help return the minority worker, and anyone, to the job market faster when layoffs are encountered. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Barriors to Employment Still Confront Minorities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.