Signatures, Descriptions Stored on New ID Cards

By May, Bill | THE JOURNAL RECORD, June 19, 1993 | Go to article overview

Signatures, Descriptions Stored on New ID Cards


May, Bill, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Journal Record Staff Reporter

When librarians from all over the United States meet in New Orleans late this month, they will discover a new way to track client activity.

Using the computerized system developed by Stik/Strip Laminating Inc. of 1027 Waterwood Parkway in Edmond, librarians will have at their fingertips photos, signatures and descriptions of clients to compare with what's on the cards.

"This is the newest product we are offering," said Ron Goade, president of the company which does business as SSI/Photo ID. "We're introducing it at the library show, but it has a lot of other applications _ for instance, in school cafeterias, for check-cashing cards, and many other things where a photo-identification card process is used."

What the system does is digitize a photo of the client, taken on the spot, and store it in the computer's memory banks. Along with the picture, there will be a description and the client's signature, which the clerk can compare to what's on the card.

"Clerks will know instantly if someone has a card they are not supposed to have, just by looking at the picture," Goade said. "I feel that a lot of school cafeterias would like to have something like this. It gives instant, positive identification.

"This is something that's unique in our industry. The system will store patron images, and with a bar code on the card, the proper picture of the individual will appear on the computer screen, right next to the authorized signature.

"We can eliminate a lot of the problems dealing with fraud with this system, with all the data that's available. Each user can input their own data requirements. It's the first system of its kind in the world."

The system was developed by Dan Christensen, and will be manufactured in Edmond, Goade said.

While this is the newest product the company has on the market, the older products are still going strong, he said.

"1992 was a great year for us, and 1993 has every indication of being at least as good and probably even better," Goade said.

The company completed seven national projects in 1992, and has 20 nearing completion.

"We're gearing up for a number of large programs," Goade said.

In the past year, the company has "down sized and expanded" at the same time, growing to 200 employees, but changing out some equipment.

"Every manufacturing job we do is a little different, so it necessitates designing and getting new equipment for the job," Goade said. "It's nothing like General Motors does, but right now we're in the process of retooling our shop to get ready for the next big job."

Besides retooling for new projects, the company has restructured, bringing in some top managers. Dick Theriault has been named chief operating officer, while Drew Johnson has been named vice president in charge of sales and marketing. He will oversee all national sales programs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Signatures, Descriptions Stored on New ID Cards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.