Morrison Tucker Helped Shape Banking Industry

By Titus, Nancy Raiden | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 27, 1993 | Go to article overview

Morrison Tucker Helped Shape Banking Industry


Titus, Nancy Raiden, THE JOURNAL RECORD


By Nancy Raiden Titus

Journal Record Staff Reporter

When you know an industry well enough to design the specialized forms it uses, you know the industry. Being around it for 60 years doesn't hurt either.

Longtime Oklahoma City resident Morrison G. Tucker, 82, has helped to shape the banking industry on this continent and beyond, though you wouldn't know it from his reserved demeanor.

He was on the original team of examiners for the newly formed Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. back in 1933 and later became the agency's assistant chief examiner. He also wrote its first bank examination manual.

After World War II, he worked with what was left of the Philippine government to reopen that country's banks. He later lived in Venezuela, overseeing the financial interests of the family of a college buddy _ Nelson Rockefeller.

Tucker has been known around Oklahoma City as a professional and innovative banker. Sometimes his innovations have met with success and sometimes with failure, but even after more than 40 years here he continues to make an impression on fellow bankers.

He came to Oklahoma City in 1951 and has had a hand in more than a half dozen banking related companies, including his pride and joy, American Bank Systems Inc.

Tucker's interest in typography led him to begin the bank form company in 1968. The company has designed more than 600 forms and software systems. The task requires attention to detail and understanding of the ever-changing regulatory requirements, including such laws as Truth in Savings, which went into effect last month and required new kinds of disclosures for deposit accounts.

Among the innovations developed by the company are courses to help banks set up or improve their credit filing system. The system includes software and a color-coded organizational system for paper credit files.

Tucker sold his interest in the company on July 10 to James W. Bruce Jr. and Edwin B. Cook, president. Bruce, the new majority owner, became the chairman and chief executive officer. Tucker continues to serve as vice chairman and remains an active participant.

"I enjoy the work and the people. They are awfully nice people," he said.

Tucker also has been involved in numerous civic activities over the years. He has limited his involvement in recent years to Oklahoma City University, where he serves as chairman of the trustees' 12-person executive committee.

He also has been the leadoff speaker the past two years at the university's new Jack T. Conn Graduate School of Community Banking.

Tucker, or Tuck as he is affectionately known, began his banking career in 1932 with the U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, the regulator of national banks. He was transferred to the FDIC in June 1933 and worked for the agency for 11 years before going into the Navy in 1943.

Tucker said the view of the type of protection provided by the FDIC has changed over the years since the agency was first formed. Today policy makers emphasize the protection of small depositors. In the beginning, the coverage was viewed as a stabilizer of the financial payments system. The proof that it achieved its goal of stabilization came in the '80s when there were virtually no runs despite numerous failures. Runs were common during the succession of financial panics that occurred before the formation of the federal agency.

His Navy experience put him in the Philippines when that nation was in need of help to rebuild its banking system after the devastation of the war. Tucker served for about a year as a banking adviser to the Philippine government.

"Their government needed somebody to reopen their banks. I had had experience as the assistant chief of examinations for the FDIC nationwide."

The Philippine banking system was in shambles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Morrison Tucker Helped Shape Banking Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.