Sculley Resigns Leadership after 10 Years with Apple

By Fatsis, Stefan | THE JOURNAL RECORD, October 16, 1993 | Go to article overview

Sculley Resigns Leadership after 10 Years with Apple


Fatsis, Stefan, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Stefan Fatsis

Associated Press

NEW YORK _ Apple Computer Inc. Chairman John Sculley, who turned the easy-to-use Macintosh from a novelty into a marketing wonder of the 1980s, resigned Friday after 10 years at the forefront of the computer revolution.

The move had been expected since Sculley was replaced as chief executive in June, and he leaves on a down note. For Apple, 1993 has brought weak profits, a major restructuring and profound questions about its future.

Sculley, 54, did not announce his plans. But he has been rumored as a candidate for top corporate jobs, and analysts said the ardent cheerleader for 21st century technologies would be a natural for one of the combinations sweeping the communications industry.

Mike Markkula, 51, a vice chairman and one of Apple's founders, was named chairman. Sculley, who joined Apple in 1983 from Pepsico Inc., was succeeded as CEO by Michael Spindler.

"I've had some wonderful years at Pepsi, an extraordinary journey at Apple and now I'm ready to head off to new challenges," Sculley said in a statement.

Sculley won a power struggle in 1985 with techie Steven Jobs _ who founded Apple in a California garage _ and led its transformation from a $600 million company with a small following into an $8 billion colossus.

Apple's colorful, point-and-click Macintosh line won over a generation of first-time computer users. More than 10 million Macintosh computers have been sold since its splashy 1984 introduction.

"He was not a pioneer in the context of a Jobs or a Hewlett-Packard, but he was clearly one of the ones who was able to take the technology and bring it into the mainstream," said Tim Bajarin, president of Creative Strategies, a Santa Clara, Calif., consulting firm.

"Being a pioneer in technology is almost less important than being able to capitalize on it," he said.

Sculley's exit was rooted in the year-old PC price wars that have slashed profit margins across the industry.

Weak demand for its pricey Macintoshes left large stockpiles. Apple's U.S. market share was 12.3 percent in the first half of 1993, down from 13.3 percent a year earlier, according to International Data Corp. in Framingham, Mass.

Sculley stepped down as CEO shortly before Apple laid off about 2,500 employees and reported its biggest quarterly loss ever _ $188 million. The company said leaving that job was his idea, but a former director, Albert Eisenstat, has claimed in a lawsuit that Sculley was forced out.

Signs that Sculley was detaching himself from Apple were plentiful. He began spending more time as a company and industry visionary, rather than running operations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sculley Resigns Leadership after 10 Years with Apple
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.