International Panel to Choose OU Neustadt Literature Prize

THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 22, 1994 | Go to article overview

International Panel to Choose OU Neustadt Literature Prize


An international panel of 12 novelists, dramatists, poets, playwrights and essayists from five continents will convene March 17 through 19 at the Oklahoma Center for Continuing Education on the University of Oklahoma Norman campus to select the 13th laureate of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature.

This year's recipient of the Neustadt Prize will receive a $40,000 award. The award, which in 1992 was increased by $15,000, is administered by the University of Oklahoma and its international quarterly, World Literature Today. Funding for the award is ensured in perpetuity by an endowment from the Neustadt family of Ardmore.

One indication of the prestige of the Neustadt Prize is its record of 16 laureates, candidates or jurors who in the past 20 years have been awarded Nobel Prizes following their involvement with the Neustadt Prize. The latest instance was in 1993, when African-American novelist and essayist Toni Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature while a candidate for the 1994 Neustadt Prize.

The Neustadt Prize is the only international literary award emanating from the United States for which poets, playwrights and novelists are given equal consideration.

The prize was first awarded in 1970, with Italian poet Giuseppe Ungaretti as the laureate. Other winners have been novelist and Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Colombia, 1972; poet Francis Ponge, France, 1974; poet Elizabeth Bishop, United States, 1976; poet and also Nobel laureate Czeslaw Milosz, Poland, 1978; and novelist Josef Skvorecky, Czechoslovakia, 1980.

Other winners have been poet and Nobel laureate Octavio Paz, Mexico, 1982; poet and dramatist Paavo Haavikko, Finland, 1984; novelist and playwright Max Freisch, Switzerland, 1986; novelist Raja Rao of India, 1988; poet Tomas Transtromer, Sweden, 1990; and poet Joao Cabral de Melo Neto, Brazil, 1992.

The 1994 jurors already have nominated candidates prior to the panel's meeting in March. Jurors will make oral presentations on each nominee before balloting begins.

No candidate has been put forth by Djelal Kadir, chairman of the Neustadt committee and editor/director of World Literature Today, but he will cast the deciding vote in case of a tie.

The jurors are: Kofi Nyidevu Awoonor of Ghana. Awoonor, a poet, novelist, dramatist and critic, has served as his country's Permanent Representative and ambassador to the United Nations since 1990. He has been honored with the Columbia University Translation Award, a Rockefeller Fellowship, the Dillon's Commonwealth Award, Brazil's Cruzeiro do Sol, and the Ghana Association of Writers Distinguished Author Award. Zoya Boguslavskaya of Russia. The novelist, playwright and essayist is member of the Russian Writers Union and the Russian PEN Center, and general director of the Triumph Fund, which administers the country's most prestigious and remunerative awards in the arts. Alan Cheuse of the United States. Cheuse, a novelist, essayist and critic, is past director of the Bennington (Vt.) Summer Writing Workshops and has taught at the University of Virginia, the University of Michigan, Bennington College, the University of the South and the University of Tennessee.

As a book commentator, he is a regular contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered," and he serves as host and co-producer of NPR's syndicated short-story magazine for radio, "The Sound of Writing." John M. Coetzee of South Africa. Coetzee, a novelist, critic and translator, currently is a professor of general literature at the University of Cape Town. He also is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and an honorary fellow of the Modern Language Association and has held visiting positions at the State University of New York in Buffalo, Johns Hopkins University and Harvard. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

International Panel to Choose OU Neustadt Literature Prize
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.