Clinton Postpones Proposals to Reform Labor Law

THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 11, 1994 | Go to article overview

Clinton Postpones Proposals to Reform Labor Law


After promising to come up by midyear with proposals to deal with some of the nation's thorniest labor issues _ including whether to strengthen unions and how to regulate workers' councils _ the Clinton administration has decided to wait until November, probably after the congressional election.

The postponement is a setback for labor leaders, who had hoped that the administration would move forcefully to reverse labor's weakening position at the bargaining table. Seeking early action on this front, the president appointed a blue-ribbon commission last May to make policy recommendations within one year.

The commission sought an extension, arguing that its recommendations would be too contentious unless it had more time to sell its ideas. And the administration agreed to the postponement last weekend, even though it has been deferring action on labor issues until after the report is filed.

Justifying the delay, Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich said in an interview: "Worker-management relations today are very tense, given all the corporate downsizings, the increased litigation in the workplace, the technological changes and the enormous pressures on companies to cut costs."

The commission is headed by John T. Dunlop, a Harvard economist who was secretary of labor in the Ford administration. Most of the nine other members are former labor secretaries or academicians.

Among the proposals the commission is considering are steps that would make forming a union easier or would force binding arbitration on management in labor disputes. To make such recommendations easier for corporate America to accept, the commission will issue only "findings of fact" in May.

"The important thing is to draw a line between the process of finding facts and the process of what to do about them," Dunlop said. "I want people to be able to say these facts are right or wrong or they need to be amended, and then after the nation has confronted the facts, we can come up with solutions."

One finding of fact already decided upon, commission members say, concerns the fate of workers engaged in trying to organize a union. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Clinton Postpones Proposals to Reform Labor Law
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.