OU, OSU Rank among Top Business Schools

By Titus, Nancy Raiden | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 22, 1994 | Go to article overview

OU, OSU Rank among Top Business Schools


Titus, Nancy Raiden, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Journal Record Staff Reporter

Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma both ranked in the top 20 among national business schools in their ability to add value to students, according to a study by two East Coast scholars.

OSU was ranked eighth, and OU was ranked 18th out of 63 business schools studied by Joseph Tracy and Joel Waldfogel, who were both economists at Yale University when the study was done. Tracy has since moved to Columbia University.

The research was an attempt to relate how well the school improved the student's earnings capacity by comparing the quality of the student going into the school with the earnings received afterwards.

"We took the measure of student quality and the salary that could be predicted for that student and the difference between the salary earned and the amount predicted based on those characteristics. We called that difference the value added," Tracy explained.

"A lot of people focus on salaries and opinions," he said, referring to the well-known guide published by Business Week. "We looked at how they related to student quality and the value added."

The Business Week ranking weighed initial student quality twice as heavily as the value added by the school, according to the Tracy-Waldfogel analysis, though that may not have been by design.

"Many earlier rankings place the emphasis on the quality of the students. Schools like Oklahoma State, which are not near the top, are getting undervalued by other surveys. Among the schools completing our survey, Oklahoma State is doing a very good job in terms of students. Schools like Oklahoma State should get recognition."

Schools that placed ahead of OSU in the study were: Stanford University, first; Harvard University, second; University of Chicago, third; University of Virginia, fourth; University of Pennsylvania, fifth; Northwestern University, sixth; and University of Michigan, seventh.

Finishing out the top 10 were: University of New Mexico, at ninth and Wake Forest University at 10th.

The biggest surprise in the study was the number of schools that rank high in the Business Week list but low in the Tracy-Waldfogel list. Those included Dartmouth, which dropped from sixth in Business Week to 57th on the valueadded list; the University of California at Los Angeles, which fell from 10th to 59th; and Massachusetts' Institute of Technology, which fell from 11th to 51st.

The program at Yale University, which showed the highest student quality according to the survey, came in dead last according to the value-added study.

The study analyzed the graduating class of 1991. Information was taken from public sources and surveys of the individual schools.

OSU ranked 54th for student quality and OU ranked 61st. …

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