Integris Institute to Update Community on Health Services

By KirLee Davis Assistant Managing Editor | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 11, 1996 | Go to article overview

Integris Institute to Update Community on Health Services


KirLee Davis Assistant Managing Editor, THE JOURNAL RECORD


It's no wonder the public has difficulty keeping pace with today's evolving health care industry. Even veterans of the field have often checked their bearings over the last decade as shifting market forces dramatically reshaped their business.

Recognizing that problem, Integris Health -- parent of Integris Baptist Medical Center and many other Sooner State institutions -- has created what it considers to be the first program of its kind in the nation.

The Integris Institute is an educational and leadership training course focusing on the health care industry. Its inaugural 32-member class will participate in four day-long sessions over seven months that will highlight different aspects of the health services industry. Each session will be split equally between presentations and participant interaction. "The program is part of Integris' mission to improve the health status of the individuals and the communities we serve," said Lynn Horton, director of the Business Health Institute, the 2-year-old division of Integris Health orchestrating the Integris Institute. "Integris is taking the lead with this educational endeavor because we truly believe it is imperative individuals understand the changes occurring in health care today and how those changes will affect them." The institute is not a tool to focus attention on Integris, noted Horton, who declined to disclose program costs. Training sessions will involve facilities off the Baptist Medical Center campus and instructors from outside Integris. "It's similar to the structure for something like Leadership Oklahoma or Leadership Oklahoma City," she noted, "in that each year we hope to have a new class, and by doing so we'd educate a broader class of people." The Oklahoma City community will therefore benefit from a sort of "trickle-down" educational theory. "It's our belief that if we make that concentrated effort to educate 40 people a year, those 40 people will in turn educate five to 10 of their closest friends," she said. …

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