Evaluation Panel Forms for Memorial Design

THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Evaluation Panel Forms for Memorial Design


The design evaluation panel has been named for the first stage of the Oklahoma City bombing memorial design competition, officials announced Thursday.

The open contest is to select a design for the memorial to the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing.

The nine-member panel consists of six internationally-recognized design experts and three members of the Family and Survivor Committee of the Oklahoma City Memorial Foundation. Named by Mayor Ron Norick, the panel will judge the stage one competition entries and will choose the three to five finalists that will move on to the second stage. Those finalists will be named April 19, the second anniversary of the bombing. Finalists will then be judged and a winner announced by July. Named to the panel are: * Robert Campbell, a writer and architect from Cambridge, Mass. Campbell is the architecture critic for the Boston Globe and is a Pulitzer Prize-winning critic and contributing editor to the Architectural Record magazine. * Richard Haag, a landscape architect from Seattle. He is the founder and chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington and is the only person to twice receive the American Society of Landscape Architects President's Award for Design Excellence. * Bill Moggridge, a native of Great Britain, is one of the world's leading experts in industrial design. He is a senior fellow of the Royal College of Arts and a trustee of the Design Museum in London as well as a lecturer at Stanford University. …

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Evaluation Panel Forms for Memorial Design
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