Healthy Competition Should Be Driving Force in Medical Industry

By Dunlap, David | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 26, 1997 | Go to article overview

Healthy Competition Should Be Driving Force in Medical Industry


Dunlap, David, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Even before President Clinton's ideas for health care reform were brought to the nation's political agenda, it was clear to most in the industry that the cost and methods of providing medical care to our country's citizens had gotten out of control.

But the idea of growth and competition among the health care industry -- even if it possibly meant the reduction of those costs and greater effectiveness of the service -- has sparked controversy, depending on which provider or legislator you talk to.

State and federal governments have tried to establish regulations and even lofty national health care systems to control costs and create efficiency, but nothing has worked to date. And for many health care organizations, this has meant the opportunity to rethink the way health care is delivered in this country and possibly run it the way successful businesses in America have operated for years. These days, every hospital and health care system has to run on a fiscally responsible basis, in order to reinvest in its facilities, update technology, and pay its employees. The growth of managed care and capitated fee-for-service has caused everyone in this industry to re-evaluate their costs. Even the tax-exempt hospitals, which didn't have to worry about financial accountability in the past, are finding that they need to be more prudent in their spending and efficient in their systems. An integrated health care delivery system that can control costs through large vendor contracts, networked medical information and shared resources of numerous hospitals and facilities working together, means efficiency and quality patient care. Hospitals and health care systems that attempt to compete in this new world of patient care by running their operations more fiscally responsible have met with criticism from other health care systems, hospitals and certain public officials who see their growth as a threat to "business as usual" in a changing world. Even when met with the reality that government intervention to control costs hasn't worked, these critics still search for ways to improve health care efficiency without changing much of the traditional methodology. These past attempts on the part of government to control costs haven't worked. In the 1970s, the government attempted to slow the growth of health care costs by limiting the number and geographic distribution of health care facilities, equipment and services by enacting Certificate of Need (CON) regulations in each state. In 1974, the National Health Planning and Development Act was enacted by Congress, which required states to establish and administer CON regulations as part of the overall health planning process. This attempt failed over time. In 1982, when Congress realized that CON had failed to meet its health planning and cost containment objectives, the CON requirement was repealed. Since then, 17 states have totally repealed CON programs and several others have removed CON requirements for hospitals. Oklahoma was one such state to remove the hospital portion of the CON requirement. A recent attempt in Oklahoma by one state senator to re-establish CON requirements in the state has been tabled thus far. The Oklahoma Hospital Association has gone on record as publicly supporting the continued repeal, so it looks as though, for the time being, Certificate of Need is still not the answer for controlling the cost of health care in Oklahoma. CON aside, critics of systems attempting to grow in this state are still wary of expansion. These critics are doing a disservice to our state's citizens, however, by perpetuating myths that are not accurate. The idea of competition in a free marketplace is a sound one which is the very backbone of our country's economic system. Competition makes us stronger, provides more choice and greater quality for the consumer, and brings out the best potential of each player. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Healthy Competition Should Be Driving Force in Medical Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.