New TV Camera Uses Special Type of Signal

By Don Horine Cox News Service | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 8, 1997 | Go to article overview

New TV Camera Uses Special Type of Signal


Don Horine Cox News Service, THE JOURNAL RECORD


BOCA RATON, Fla. -- The impending revolution in television technology is going to make some people rich. One of them may be a Florida Atlantic University professor who has developed a camera that could become an integral part of the new technology.

If Bill Glenn prospers from the invention, so will FAU, because for every dollar he gets, the university will get almost two.

Glenn's camera, which would be used by television production companies and which probably would cost several hundred thousand dollars each, puts out a special kind of signal he has developed called visually compressed digital. The signal eliminates unnecessary data that the eye cannot see.

The camera contains a sensor developed by Eastman Kodak that scans images progressively, meaning it reads each of the hundreds of lines in an image rather than every other line as the interlaced sensors used in standard television cameras do now. The images thus are even more precise than the interlaced high-definition TV scan already being produced in Japan.

The first digital, high-definition TV sets will go on sale next year. By the end of 1999, 53 percent of the nation's households must be able to receive high-definition programming from at least three television stations, according to a rule approved by the Federal Communications Commission in April.

According to the FCC's current timetable, only high-definition television signals will be broadcast after 2006. That will render obsolete all 240 million TV sets now in use across the country, unless special converters are added to the sets.

The FCC has not specified which format -- interlaced or progressive -- is to be used on HDTV, and it is likely that both will. With a converter, a new HDTV set will be able to receive both formats.

Glenn is confident the film industry will prefer his progressive format.

Mike McCreary, director of operations of Kodak's micro-electronics technology division, said Glenn's camera is more technologically advanced than any other camera he's aware of.

"He's done a marvelous job," McCreary said. "The need for high- resolution, progressive-scan cameras is going to be increasing tremendously because of the new HDTV standards. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

New TV Camera Uses Special Type of Signal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.