Drug Abuse Problems Rise as Labor Pool Shrinks

By Noelle Knox N. Y. Times News Service | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 24, 1998 | Go to article overview

Drug Abuse Problems Rise as Labor Pool Shrinks


Noelle Knox N. Y. Times News Service, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Illegal drugs are a big problem for Garry M. Ritzky: too many of his job applicants use them. Ritzky, risk and human resources director for the Oklahoma City transportation and oil services company Turner Brothers Trucking, is having a hard time finding candidates who are clean of cocaine, marijuana and heroin.

"We have an oil pipe operation that uses unskilled laborers, and we're seeing more positive drug tests," he said. "We had three last week."

The number of positive drug tests among applicants for low- skilled jobs at Turner Brothers has doubled in the last year, Ritzky added. Such evidence, while mostly anecdotal, runs counter to the decline in positive drug tests most businesses have seen the last decade. Yet with the unemployment rate at a 25-year low and the economy continuing to grow, more human resource managers say they are starting to see a small but disturbing increase in the number of job applicants who fail screening for drug and alcohol abuse. One reason for that increase, they say, is that as the supply of potential employees continues to shrink, those with drug and alcohol problems probably represent a larger portion of the labor pool. Some also say a number of products now available to beat drug tests are encouraging some job applicants to take chances. And marijuana, they say, is again in vogue. According to a study released late last year by the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, 16 percent of unemployed people used illicit drugs in 1994. When the data were collected, unemployment was at 6.1 percent. Today, with unemployment at 4.7 percent, qualified job seekers are harder to find. "Employers are finding it harder to find people who are not using drugs," said James G. Lipari, public health adviser for the federal government's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. "Since there are more employers using testing and other prevention means, there are more people who are unemployed for that reason, which makes the pool of unemployed who are using drugs great." But these apparent trends are not yet reflected in the data. When drug testing first became widespread, in the late 1980s, about 18 percent of the tests showed signs of drug use, according to SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories, one of the nation's largest drug-testing labs. That number, which represents mostly screening of applicants and a small amount of tests for workers already on the job, fell steadily, to 8. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Drug Abuse Problems Rise as Labor Pool Shrinks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.