Liggett Gets Cold Shoulder in Tobacco Cases

By Mills, Karren | THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 18, 1998 | Go to article overview

Liggett Gets Cold Shoulder in Tobacco Cases


Mills, Karren, THE JOURNAL RECORD


ST. PAUL, Minn. -- When defense attorneys in Minnesota's tobacco trial gather to talk strategy, lawyers for the Liggett Group aren't welcome.

When the tobacco attorneys head for dinner after a grinding day in court, Liggett attorneys aren't tagging along. And when Liggett chief Bennett LeBow came to testify, there were no nods of support from most of the lawyers at the defense tables.

The reason for the cold shoulder? Liggett, the smallest major tobacco company, has acknowledged that cigarettes are addictive and cause disease, and LeBow said so in court. And it even prints the warning "Smoking is addictive" on every pack of its Chesterfield, L&M, Lark and Eve cigarettes. "Defense lawyers treat Liggett lawyers as just more lawyers for the plaintiffs. They are truly that -- in word, deed and function," said Mike York, an attorney for Philip Morris. Thomas McKim, an attorney for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco, added: "They're not part of the joint defense. It's certainly an awkward situation." The state of Minnesota and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota are suing the tobacco companies for $1.77 billion spent on smoking- related illnesses, plus punitive damages. Liggett is a defendant only of Blue Cross, having settled its lawsuits with states. Liggett lead attorney James Stricker acknowledged the company is in a sticky situation. "We are the company taking a separate position, which is the true position. Smoking is addictive and it causes these diseases," he said. "Liggett is doing what they believe is the right thing." When LeBow testified for the state last week, he may have further distanced himself -- and his company -- from the tobacco industry. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Liggett Gets Cold Shoulder in Tobacco Cases
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.