Computer Education -- a Must

By Clark, Travis | THE JOURNAL RECORD, July 6, 1998 | Go to article overview

Computer Education -- a Must


Clark, Travis, THE JOURNAL RECORD


There's an e-mail that circulates ever so often in this wide cyberspatial world. It's a cyber-urban legend, but it does present an interesting question and topic.

The e-mail goes like this (paraphrased):

Compaq (or Hewlett-Packard, Gateway, Dell, Packard Bell or any other computer-maker) is about to design a keyboard with an extra key. This key will be labeled "Any."

The reason for this is that there have been a number of people calling Technical Support, asking where the "Any" key is, because the screen reads "To continue, press any key."

Of course in this world of stupid crimes, stupid people and television programs where viewers actually send in videos of dogs singing with a piano, this doesn't surprise a lot of people.

But it does bring the topic in mind: computer education.

Education in computer use is essential in this technological world. And unfortunately, the ones who need it most are adults. Children pick it up easy, and adults seem to need more help. Computer education is probably the most important investment a company can make in its employees. The more your employees are comfortable with computers, the more efficient they will become.

Where to go for computer education? …

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