Business World

THE JOURNAL RECORD, December 2, 1998 | Go to article overview

Business World


Creamy, crunchy Rukeyser

CLEVELAND (AP) -- Wall Street Week host Louis Rukeyser has his very own candy bar. A regional chain of 13 shops, Malley's Chocolates, began selling the $1 candy bar recently to raise money for charity. It's a milk chocolate and rice crisp concoction. "I went to one of Rukeyser's seminars in Las Vegas a couple of years ago and we thought it would be fun to do a bar for him," said the company's chairman, Bill Malley. Rukeyser's show airs Fridays on PBS.

Microsoft bunnies REDMOND, Wash. (ABC) -- First the antitrust suit. Then the AOL- Netscape merger. Now -- bunnies? A few years ago, someone discarded a few domesticated rabbits near Microsoft's Redmond campus. For some reason others followed suit. Before you could say "Evil Empire," the furry ones multiplied (surprise, surprise) until an estimated 1,000 bunnies roamed several acres of raw land and office park. While they're cute to look at, they've become something of a menace. Not only do they bravely beg for handouts, they have a knack for getting run over by cars. The situation got so out of hand that the Humane Society, the city of Redmond and the animal-protection organization PAWS decided to take action. With donations from Microsoft and its employees, along with cash from other nearby businesses, the group plans to catch all the bunnies (they've nabbed 300 so far) and release them somewhere in the area on a private reserve. Bradshaw's in demand CHICAGO (Bloomberg) -- Former Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Terry Bradshaw was named the sports personality companies want most to hire as a motivational speaker, although he isn't the most expensive, according to a poll. Bradshaw, currently a football analyst for Fox Sports, charges $35,000 a speech, according to a survey conducted by Burns Sports, a Chicago-based firm that hires athletes as endorsers for companies. Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana and former Oakland Raiders coach and current Fox Sports football announcer John Madden have billed as much as $60,000 for a motivational talk, company executives said, although neither sports personality made the survey's top 10. Burns Sports' annual survey asks industry executives to choose the sports celebrity they'd want most to inspire their employees. Former Notre Dame Coach Lou Holtz won the poll last year and finished second this year. Boston Celtics Coach Rick Pitino finished third, followed by ESPN college basketball commentator Dick Vitale and former Chicago Bulls star Bob Love. Rounding out the top 10 were ESPN football analyst and former Washington Redskins quarterback Joe Theismann, Miami Heat coach Pat Riley; former Pittsburgh Steelers running back Rocky Bleier; former Olympic gymnast Mary Lou Retton; and former Olympian Bruce Jenner. AOL incentives CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) -- America Online is offering all 2,300 Netscape employees an extra month's pay as an incentive to stay on at least until AOL completes its takeover. Steve Case, the chairman of America Online, sought to assure employees of Netscape that the Internet innovator will remain "a cool company," while acknowledging that corporate talent-hunters have their eye on Netscape's headquarters. AOL's $4.3 billion takeover of Netscape, and a separate deal with Sun Microsystems, will be a good thing for Netscape employees, officials of all three companies said at the meeting with workers. Case told Netscape workers Monday that after the merger is completed next spring, stock options will remain valuable, their sabbatical program will remain in place and their corporate culture will remain intact. "Maybe you joined the company because it was a cool company," he said. "We are not changing any of that. We want to run this as an independent culture." Pepsi One scores PURCHASE, N.Y. (Bloomberg) -- PepsiCo's soft-drink sales rose more than expected in late October and early November, partly because of strong initial demand for its new Pepsi One diet cola. …

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