Biomedical Research Means Jobs for Oklahomans

By J. Donald Capra | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 13, 1999 | Go to article overview

Biomedical Research Means Jobs for Oklahomans


J. Donald Capra, THE JOURNAL RECORD


In a previous column, I wrote about the need for a concerted effort among the state's decision-makers -- governmental, business, civic and academic -- to work together to lay the groundwork so that Oklahoma can receive its equitable share of federal biomedical research dollars. That figure, close to $100 million per year, would be an indicator of excellence in biomedical research in the state. Another effect, however, of a sustained, outstanding biomedical research program is economic, and it is that I would like to address in this column.

Successful biomedical research programs throughout the nation are able to attract about twice as many research dollars from outside the state than funds provided locally. At the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, that number is about 1.0, so we need to do better. The multiplier effect, however, of the funds brought into Oklahoma is rather impressive.

Various economists approach this differently, so I will use two methods of analysis. One teaches that for every dollar brought into the state, the economy is grown by $4. Thus, with OMRF's competitive grants bringing in about $12 million from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, and other nonprofit "disease" related organizations, one could say that the Oklahoma economy is buoyed to almost $50 million - - a rather impressive amount from a single institution in our state. The University of Oklahoma, both the Health Sciences Center and Norman campuses, and Oklahoma State University have similar stories. Net result: Biomedical funding is a powerful engine that fuels our economy. Another method computes economic impact in terms of jobs. The OMRF employs (or has on contract) about 450 people. Since about half of our funds come from outside the state, one could view this as 225 jobs created from our own biomedical research effort alone. These economists say that "for every job created directly by funds from outside the state, another job is created in the community. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Biomedical Research Means Jobs for Oklahomans
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.