Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso Meet in Fort Worth

By Gilmore, Joan | THE JOURNAL RECORD, April 26, 1999 | Go to article overview

Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso Meet in Fort Worth


Gilmore, Joan, THE JOURNAL RECORD


FORT WORTH -- Time is running out if you have been thinking about running down to Fort Worth to see the Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso exhibition at the Kimbell Museum. This fantastic comparison of the art works of two of the world's more famous artists will close May 2. More than 100 paintings, sculptures and drawings from collections around the world are highlighted in this exhibition, which has drawn record crowds. The works by the two artists represent the second part of their careers, beginning in the late 1920s.

The exhibition has been organized by Kimbell for an exclusive showing in Fort Worth and is guest-curated by the distinguished Matisse and Picasso scholar Yve-Alain Bois, the Joseph Pulitzer Jr., professsor of modern art at Harvard University.

Dr. Timothy Potts, director of the Kimbell Art Museum, says Matisse and Picasso have been the subject of extensive study and of many exhibitions that have examined their lives and works from a multitude of different angles. He says that never before has there been an exhibition such as this, that documents the keen and often touching rivalry, born of a strong mutual respect, between the two artists in the years of their maturity. While never a real fan of Picasso's work, viewing this exhibition provided a realistic insight into why he chose to paint in his unique manner. By contrast, Matisse always has been a favorite of mine. Yet the comparisons of paintings by the two reveal an intertwined evolution. As Potts describes it, "an ongoing game of chess between two masters," a game in which the vibrant dialogue was ended when Matisse died in 1954. Picasso lived until 1973 and continued to paint many canvases which seem to be odes to his deceased friend. The commentary on the optional Acoustiguide Audio Tour contributed greatly to the enjoyment and understanding of this fine exhibition. Several books and catalogues about the exhibit and the two artists are available at the museum. Also on view at the Kimbell is Gifts of the Nile: Ancient Egyptian Faience. Now don't say you've seen all the Egyptian exhibits because this one isn't about mummies and tombs and stuff. It's about one of the world's most beautiful forms of ancient ceramic, which is called Egyptian faience. Usually it's a brilliant blue-green color with turquoise being the favorite hue. …

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