Libraries Receive Aid from Gates

By Marie Price The Journal Record | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 8, 1999 | Go to article overview

Libraries Receive Aid from Gates


Marie Price The Journal Record, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Close to $2.5 million in grants and services from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Library Initiative will be split among 168 of Oklahoma's 205 public library sites, Gov. Frank Keating and other officials announced Tuesday.

Microsoft is donating another $1.5 million in software to be used with new computer workstations.

"Melinda and I believe in bringing opportunity through technology and education to all people," Gates said. "We are pleased to support the efforts of so many in Oklahoma to ensure that all people have the tools they need to learn and work in the 21st century."

The Metropolitan Library System will receive $169,493 at 15 sites, for eight servers and 52 computers.

Donna Morris, director of public services for the system, said that all but Bethany, Village and Warr Acres libraries will receive the grant funding. She said these facilities, in areas above the poverty threshold, will be eligible for purchasing hardware and software at a discount to provide standardized equipment for the entire system. The Spencer extension facility will also not receive the computer enhancement funding.

Computers are due in the other facilities by mid-December. System technical personnel will receive training in Seattle, Morris said, and they will in turn train other personnel.

"Not since Andrew Carnegie has such a tremendous gift been given to Oklahomans in the form of assistance to libraries," said Keating. "This gift ensures that Oklahomans will have access to the latest information technologies through their public libraries."

Carnegie, a major benefactor behind the proliferation of public libraries early in this century, could never have envisioned an information system through which people could access libraries throughout the world, Keating added.

The governor said the grants will enable Oklahoma to be "a member of the world learning community."

Keating said that one of the challenges facing Oklahoma is to upgrade the knowledge and access of Oklahomans of all ages "in the high-speed, digital economy, the information-technology age in which we live." Though many Oklahomans still do not have personal access, he said, the state is endeavoring to give its public schools access through OneNet and other facilities. He said that acquiring such knowledge and skill is vital to their participation as "citizens of the world" in the information age.

Robert Clark, director of the Oklahoma Department of Public Libraries, said that implementation of the grants has already commenced, with installation and staff training due for completion by mid-2000.

"These new computer workstations will be strictly for the public's use," said Clark. "ODL has worked to help public libraries in the state establish Internet access. But many smaller libraries have only one computer, which may be restricted for staff use. This grant ensures a public access point at these libraries."

Clark said the gift will benefit all Oklahomans.

"This grant really makes a lot of difference in what we can do in providing public access, in creating some type of closing of the `digital divide' that prevents people without the resources to have computers and Internet access in their homes, to have this through the library," he added. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Libraries Receive Aid from Gates
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.