Van Dyke Gives $100,000 to OU Chair

THE JOURNAL RECORD, February 2, 2000 | Go to article overview

Van Dyke Gives $100,000 to OU Chair


NORMAN (JR) -- Gene Van Dyke, president and owner of Houston- based Vanco Energy, has contributed $100,000 of a $150,000 pledge to the Victor E. Monnett Chair in Energy Resources at the University of Oklahoma.

Since last year, Van Dyke has contributed two-thirds of the pledged amount to the endowed chair named in honor of the late Professor Monnett, one of Van Dyke's mentors and director of the OU School of Geology from 1924 to 1955.

Van Dyke graduated from OU in 1950 with a degree in geological engineering, became an independent producer, and has explored Texas, Louisiana, the North Sea and West Africa under his company's name for nearly 50 years. He credits Monnett for influencing his studies toward a career in the oil business.

The Victor E. Monnett Chair in Energy Resources pays tribute to Monnett, whose leadership lifted the OU School of Geology to national prominence and who influenced the education of nearly half the practicing geologists in the United States by the late 1970s.

The Monnett Chair, the first endowed faculty position established in the School of Geology and Geophysics, was created long before the onset of the Oklahoma State Regents Endowment Program, which matches private gifts for endowed faculty positions as a way to strengthen the state's colleges and universities. …

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Van Dyke Gives $100,000 to OU Chair
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