Protected Leaves of Absence, Other `Big Fish' Stories

By Teel, Kathy Reilly | THE JOURNAL RECORD, May 15, 2000 | Go to article overview

Protected Leaves of Absence, Other `Big Fish' Stories


Teel, Kathy Reilly, THE JOURNAL RECORD


Employee, "Joe," loved his bass boat. At work, Joe bragged to co- workers about how many tournaments he'd won fishing off that boat.

Joe raced home almost every night to tinker with the boat's motor and polish the boat's exterior. At company meetings, Joe's wife constantly lamented that Joe loved his bass boat more than her and the kids.

Joe loved his bass boat so much that the family cars were consigned to the driveway and the street for parking.

When not out fishing with Joe, the bass boat occupied an unfettered space, positioned diagonally -- corner to corner -- in the family garage.

Neighbors could always tell when Joe was off fishing, because his wife would immediately rush out and move her car into the garage space previously occupied by the boat -- a silent protest to her car's, and the family's, relegated status.

Some of Joe's neighbors were also his co-workers, so Joe's "fish'n frolicks" were the subject of much workplace banter.

It was not surprising, therefore, that many of Joe's numerous absences from work -- his "sick days," were speculated in workplace gossip to be related to the accompanying absence of any automobile in Joe's driveway.

Joe, his car and his beloved bass boat had "gone fish'n." Joe's wife's car was tucked away behind the garage door. Fridays, Mondays, and the days in-between, were "fish'n days."

Joe's employer tolerated Joe's love of his bass boat, his bragging about his fishing expertise, and his screaming exits from the company parking lot at the end of the day. Joe's bouts with the "Monday/Friday flu," however, quickly began to wear on his employer's patience. The employer was fairly gleeful, therefore, when Joe used up all his annual sick leave by the end of August, one year.

By the last day of that August, Joe had earned enough disciplinary points that further absences from work would, the employer decided, be remedied by termination.

The employer believed that, without paid sick leave and with his job on the line, Joe would show up to work on Mondays and Fridays and leave his bass boat in the garage.

Everyone was surprised, therefore, when Joe left work early a couple of days during the third week in September. Everyone was fairly aghast when Joe failed to show up for work for two days, Monday and Tuesday, the fourth week in September. On Tuesday, Joe called in to work and said he was sick, and that his doctor was running "tests." When Joe arrived at work on Wednesday his employer, figuring it was all a "fish story," fired him.

That's how the lawsuit began.

When the employer refused to listen to explanations, Joe hired an attorney and brought action against his employer under the Family and Medical Leave Act, or FMLA. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Protected Leaves of Absence, Other `Big Fish' Stories
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.