Travel, Technology and Customer Service

By Hedges, Bonnie J. | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 14, 2000 | Go to article overview

Travel, Technology and Customer Service


Hedges, Bonnie J., THE JOURNAL RECORD


The travel agency industry has evolved into a fast paced, e- business environment. To embrace the future of travel, travel agency owners need to have the tools and services that help their agents work smart.

Owners rely on innovators of information technology and leaders in developing products and services that will meet and fulfill each particular agency's needs. They also rely on our partners in the industry with innovative products and services that will position their agency in the forefront of travel distribution. In the efforts to keep positioned in the market, high labor and operation costs with low profit margins are cautiously reviewed.

Airline commission cuts created the opportunity for agency owners to be creative in their marketing and customer retention methods. To retain customers, travel agencies must provide more value, boost business and have the freedom to right-size technology.

E-trends are here to stay. I recently returned from Brussels, where everyone carried a cellular phone. Today on some cellular phones you can access your flight schedules, car and hotel confirmations. Soon you will be able to hit a button on your cellular, it will then call the car company or hotel company to reconfirm your reservations. These are just some of the innovative products that the travel industry must have access to and be able to communicate with. Globally every TV advertisement, radio announcement, newspaper and magazine ad end in a dot-com. So with all of this e-access why use a travel agency? Why use a lawyer or a broker? The answer is to reap the benefits of return on a relationship.

Customer service

Customer service is a two-way street beginning with trust -- the customer must trust the provider and in turn the provider trust the customer. A travel agent has access to a wealth of information and service that we can provide to our customers. We trust that our customers will take advantage of the information we provide and use us as the booking source. A relationship begins.

So how do you as a customer select and begin building a relationship with a travel agency and an agent? It may take some shopping and interviewing, even surfing the Web.

You as a customer must feel trust. Look for stability and longevity. Five years ago before the airlines restructuring of distribution costs, you could find a travel agency on nearly every corner and in shopping centers everywhere. Now many agency owners have closed the corner or shopping center offices and combined their valuable resources, their employees, into one or two offices. By doing this overhead costs were cut and more defined emphasis could be placed on customer service and continuing education for their employees.

Travel agencies that have survived the industry re-engineering have joined large consortiums, like WorldTravel Partners or Giants Select. This affiliation gives them the opportunity to take advantage of large company discount buying. (The Wal-Mart, Kmart mass purchasing application).

Best of all, because of the large company "buying power" they can pass on to you the customer, discounted prices on quality products - - products: tours and cruise that deliver exceptional value for your vacation dollar. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Travel, Technology and Customer Service
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.